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Greenland Far North - Albatros expeditions

Far North Greenland Expedition Cruise

Among the Inuit and the great explorers to the northernmost inhabited polar regions in the Kennedy channel between Canada and Greenland.

Length

14 Days

Ship category

Premium

Ship type

Large Ship

Capacity

189 Passengers

Far North Greenland Expedition

2 Reviews

Trip highlights

Wildlife watching in the icy Nares Strait

Greenland’s west coast

Ilulisat, the Iceberg Capital of Greenland

Visiting Qaanaaq, home of the Polar Inuit

The Polartours experience

Special Photo Workshop

Learn from Polar experts

Landing on Hans Island

Digital Visual Journal

Albatros Expeditions launches a unique and exciting voyage which strikes out into the northernmost reaches of Greenland. Guests will experience a region of the Arctic like no other, where adventurers of the past sought the North Pole, through which the Greenlandic explorer Knud Rasmussen travelled on his longest dog sled journey, and the home of the Polar Inuit.

The journey begins in Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland’s air hub, from where we cruise north, passing the Greenlandic cities of Sisimiut and Qeqertarsuaq (Disko Island). From here, we will venture even further north towards Cape York, in the footsteps of polar explorer Robert Peary, who passed the area in pursuit of the North Pole. Next, we will step off the edge of the map as we enter Greenland’s northernmost navigable waters in the Nares Strait. This area is vast, icy, and rarely visited. While our exact itinerary in the area will be dictated by the ice which characterizes the region, excursion options include visiting the once famously disputed territory of Hans Island, and searching for polar bears, bowhead whales and narwhals in these pristine polar waters.

As we head back southwards, we will visit Qaanaaq, Greenland’s northernmost town, and navigate further down the west coast to lively Upernavik, picturesque Uummannaq and Ilulissat, site of the largest glacier in the Northern Hemisphere. From here, we will return to Kangerlussuaq, after a voyage covering the northernmost extremes of Earth’s largest island.

Your ship: Ocean Albatros

Ocean Albatros Exterior
Ocean Albatross Deck Plan
Ocean Albatros Exterior

Welcome aboard the brand new Ocean Albatros. This stunning, purpose-built polar cruise ship will be deployed to a large selection of expedition cruise destinations, Antarctica, the Arctic, and a variety of exciting new destinations in between.

Ocean Albatros offers a total of 95 comfortable staterooms and suites, all with unobstructed sea view, and most with their own balcony. Like her sistership, the Ocean Victory, her amenities include two restaurants, a wellness area, the “Albatros Nordic Bar”, an open deck dining facility, a modern lecture lounge, and other state-of-the-art amenitie … Read more about Ocean Albatros

Cabins

french balcony suite/ albatros/ victory
Category E - French Balcony Stateroom

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

2

More about this cabin

Cat B Balcony Suite Albatros/Victory
Category B - Balcony Suite

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

2

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Premium suite albatros/victory
Two Bedroom Suite (Brynhilde Suite)

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

3

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Ocean Victory/Albatros Junior Suite
Category A - Junior Suite

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

3

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Ocean Victory/Albatros Junior Suite
Premium Suite (Freydis Suite)

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

3

More about this cabin

single porthole cabin albatros/victory
Category G - Single Porthole Stateroom

Type:

Single

Max. occupancy:

1

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Cat D/ Porthole Stateroom/ Albatros Victory
Category D - Porthole Stateroom

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

2

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Balcony C albatros/victory
Category C - Balcony Stateroom

Type:

Double/Matrimionial (convertible)

Max. occupancy:

3

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triple porthole cabin/ albatros/ victory
Category F - Triple Porthole Stateroom

Type:

Triple

Max. occupancy:

3

More about this cabin

Map

Itinerary

Keep in mind this is an expedition cruise, so your itinerary will depend greatly on the weather, amount of ice and wildlife breeding behavior.

Sea-Kayaking-What-To-Wear-In-Antarctica

0 Days

Sea Kayaking

Embark on an exhilarating sea kayaking adventure in some of the world's most magnificent and biodiverse wilderness areas, including Antarctica and the Arctic. Take in the breathtaking scenery as you navigate through ice and icebergs of all shapes and sizes. In Antarctica, spend unforgettable moments with penguins, seals and whales, and keep an eye out for the occasional encounter with leopard seals or killer whales. In the Arctic, paddle through bird colonies, past massive glaciers and around huge icebergs. Led by experienced guides, you will join a small group of like-minded adventurers to explore the picturesque coastlines of these wild and remote destinations. Paddling offers an intimate and unique way to experience the beauty of these regions and make the most of your time there. Important: This activity is subject to weather conditions and logistics.

Price on request

Quark Expeditions_ Essential Greenland Arctic
Quark Expeditions_ Essential Greenland Arctic
Quark Expeditions_ Essential Greenland Arctic

In the afternoon, we board our chartered flight in Reykjavik, Iceland, bound for Kangerlussuaq in Greenland.

Upon arrival to Kangerlussuaq (Søndre Strømfjord), we will be driven to the small port located west of the airport, where Ocean Albatros will be anchored offshore. Zodiacs will transfer us the short distance to the ship, where your stateroom awaits after check-in. After the mandatory safety drill, dine in comfort with spectacular views as we set sail through the 160-kilometer Kangerlussuaq Fjord.

Sisimiut Albatros Expeditions
Ocean Albatros Greenland

Sisimiut

After breakfast, we plan to arrive to the colourful town of Sisimiut, where we will get an idea of what modern Greenland looks like. With 5,400 inhabitants, it is Greenland’s second largest town.

In 1756, Count Johan Ludvig Holstein, established a colony here and called it “Holsteinsborg”. The oldest part of Sisimiut’s historic quarter features townhouses from this “Holsteinsborg” era, for example, the Blue Church, built in 1775.

Nowadays, Sisimiut is an important place for education and industry, and local factories process the bulk of Royal Greenland's fishing. The fish processing plant is one of the largest of its kind in Greenland, and one of the most modern in the world.

Our city tour highlights can include the historic colonial quarter, as well as the museum and the beautiful church. In the afternoon, our voyage will continue northward

Ocean Albatros
Albatros Expeditions
Ocean Albatros Exterior

Qeqertarsuaq

Below Disko Island’s 1,000-metre tall mountains, we pull into port in a protected natural harbour. The place is aptly named Godhavn (“Good harbour”) in Danish, while its Greenlandic name “Qeqertarsuaq” simply means “The Big Island”.

Up to 1950 Godhavn was the most important town north of Nuuk, the main town of Greenland, solely because of the many whales that the whaling boats towed here from the Disko Bay. This bestowed the town with much wealth, starting already in the 16th century. The town is now on its way to oblivion as it gets harder and harder to find work, and because of the infrequent connections to the mainland. We walk through town to the characteristic, octagonal church, nicknamed “the inkpot of God”. During our stay in Qeqertarsuaq, we might visit the local community.

Ocean Albatros Iceberg
Greenland
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Uummannaq

Sissiut and Itilleq

Ilulissat & Disko Bay

Kangerlussuaq

Eqi Glacier

Based on continually updated ice charts, the Captain sets as direct a course as possible all the way into Nares Strait and Hans Island. To make sure we have sufficient time to get through any pack ice, we will have a few days at sea. However, the days are by no means wasted: there are always chances to see minke whales and fin whales. We are constantly followed by the little arctic fulmar, moving from windward to lee gaining speed and dynamic in its flight along the vessel. And in the lecture hall, our expedition staff have a diverse program of lectures about Greenlandic nature and culture.

During the night we cross Melville Bay, with a coastline marked by calving glaciers. The dangerous winter ice in the bay and the long distance to the Danish colonies to the south meant that the polar Inuit from Thule district were isolated from the rest of West Greenland until just 130 years ago. They thus have a closer relationship with the Inuit in Canada and speaks a dialect that differs significantly from the southern Greenlandic language.

Uummannaq was founded as a colony in 1758 on the Nuussuaq mainland, but shortly thereafter, in 1763, it was moved to the nearby island, as seal hunting was more bountiful here. On our walk along the town’s steep streets we visit the historic train-oil building, built in 1860. Inside its yellow walls, whale and seal blubber used to be stored. Because of the horrid stench, the blubber was not boiled here, but well outside town! Behind the train-oil storage we will find a peat hut, which was still in use a few years ago.

The dry and settled arctic climate has around 2,000 hours of sunshine and 100 millimetres of precipitation per year, giving Uummannaq the right to call itself the Greenlandic Riviera!

Ocean Albatros
Greenland
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Cape York is a rocky promontory traditionally used as the boundary between Melville Bay and the legendary Thule area. Surrounded by vast glaciers calving armadas of icebergs, the area is among the most spectacular in Greenland. The area has been utilised by waves of nomadic Inuit for thousands of years, the majority of whom came to harvest iron from the famous meteorite which fell onto the ice in the region approximately 10,000 years ago. Tools made from the meteorite were far superior to the stone and bone tools more often used by the Inuit, giving hunters in this region a serious edge. The name of the nearby settlement of Savissivik (“Place of Iron”) references the importance of this find, while the Greenlandic name for Cape York itself (meaning “Place of Beads”) indicates the importance of trade with outsiders over the meteorite.

The access the local people had to iron confused early explorers in the area, who were surprised by Inughuit technological prowess. The first westerners to find the meteorite were led by American explorer Robert Peary, who orchestrated the meteorite’s theft, removal to, and sale in the USA, making a vast profit for himself while devastating the lives of the Inuit who relied on it. His infamous presence in the area is commemorated by a large granite obelisk (marked with a P and a north-facing star) on the headland of Cape York itself. Fragments of the meteorite are on display in New York and Copenhagen, while a much smaller fragment is displayed at the small town museum in Qaanaaq.

While our exact program in the area will be dictated by wind, ice and swell conditions, options include Zodiac cruising at the edges of Melville Bay, where sea and land ice meet below the Peary Monument, or visiting the small settlement of Savissivik.

Ocean Albatros Arctic and Antarctic Cruises
Greenland
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Here, we step off the edge of the map into the poorly known and rarely visited Nares Strait, gateway to the Arctic Ocean. The Nares Strait is the narrow waterway separating Greenland and Ellesmere Island, Canada. Due to the powerful Beaufort Gyre in the Arctic Ocean, the strait experiences a near-constant north-to-south current, bringing sea ice into Melville Bay even during the height of summer. This situation is made even more complex by some of the largest glaciers in the Arctic (such as the vast Petermann Glacier), which regularly calve kilometer-long icebergs into the strait; indeed, access into the Arctic Ocean through the strait is impossible most years due to expansive sea ice north of Kane Basin.

Despite the brutal conditions, the Nares Strait has been an important highway for Inuit and their ancestors since time immemorial. All inhabitants of Greenland (excluding the Norse) arrived there by crossing this strait, either by dog sled in winter, or by boat in the summer. Although the Norse never reached this far north, their artifacts have been found in the area, traded for by nomadic Inuit groups passing through the area (probably for prized walrus and narwhal ivory), hinting at these complex ancient trade networks.

More recently, the Nares Strait has been the site of one of the world’s politest political disputes. Both Canada and Denmark (on behalf of Greenland) claimed the tiny barren Hans Island, which was discovered after the borders between the two countries were established here in 1972. While the dispute dragged on, Canadian vessels would visit and leave behind a flag and a bottle of Canadian Club, while Danish vessels would remove these, raise a Danish flag and leave a bottle of schnapps, giving the dispute its nickname “the Whisky War”. This situation remained unchanged for 50 years until June 14th 2022, when the two countries agreed to divide the island equally, creating an unlikely and preposterously remote land border between Denmark and Canada.

Ocean Albatros

Thule & Qannaq

During the night we plan to escape the confines of the Nares Strait. Entering Inglefield Bay, as we pass some of Greenland’s biggest bird cliffs and are again in habituated areas. The Captain anchors Ocean Albatros off Qaanaaq, the only proper town in northwest Greenland.

The town was founded in 1953, when the Americans built their base near the original trading post of Thule. All Inuit were transferred to this new place. Today, some 600 people live in Qaanaaq, which is supported weekly by Air Greenland flights and twice a year by cargo ship.

Depending on the weather, we might take a walk through the town, where we can visit the small museum and the well stoked super market.

Ocean Albatros
Greenland
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Having left Qaanaaq in the evening, we set sail southwards towards Upernavik Region. Melville Bay is frequently icy even in summer, so the Captain and Expedition Leader will work carefully to chart a course through this treacherous region. Despite its remoteness, Melville Bay is typically relatively sheltered and calm, allowing excellent wildlife-watching opportunities; whales, a huge variety of seabirds and seals are all common in the area. Otherwise, a day at sea is an ideal opportunity to enjoy the onboard amenities of Ocean Albatros. With her patented X-Bow® design, the Ocean Albatros offers superior comfort even in rough weather, and her onboard amenities include two hot tubs, a sauna, and spa offering luxurious facials, massages and other treatments. During our day at sea, our knowledgeable onboard Expedition Team will provide lectures on Arctic culture, natural history and wildlife, as well as other activities.

Ocean Albatros
Greenland
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Karrat Fjord and Upernavik

The Upernavik territory covers an area nearly the size of Great Britain. The town itself and the ten smaller settlements in the area, inhabits some 3000 people, mostly Inuit hunters. Upernavik is a mix between the hunter culture of old and new high-tech fishing. You can equate old and new with the dog sleighs that exist alongside the modern snowmobiles.

The city itself was founded as a Danish colonial station, but the surrounding areas and small villages history go back more than 4500 years. This was when groups of hunters and gatherers travelled along the coasts of Alaska, Canada and ultimately, Greenland.

If going according to plan, we anchor and make a landing, allowing us to visit the little city and the open air museum.

Nights are getting darker, and it might be a good idea to dress up warm, go on deck and check the sky for the aurora borealis -the Northern Lights.

Ocean Albatros Uummannaq
Greenland
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Uummannaq

When you wake up this morning, you should find yourself in one of Greenland’s most beautiful and sunny regions. The ship is set to reach Uummannaq, situated on a small island. The impressive 1,175 metre heart-shaped mountain has given the town its name (Uummannaq means ‘place where the heart is’). There should be enough time to explore the city before heading back to the ship for lunch.

Albatros Expedition Disko Bay
Disko Bay
Albatros Expedition Disko Bay

Ilulissat & Disko Bay

Ilulissat is one of the most scenic located towns in Greenland. The name simply means ‘icebergs’ in Greenlandic, and the town’s nickname is rightly ‘the Iceberg Capital of the World’.

Just south of town, Ilulissat Icefjord expels gigantic icebergs into the cold waters of Disko Bay. These impressive frozen structures are born some 30km deeper into the fjord by the enormous Sermeq Kujalleq Glacier. This 10km wide glacier is the most productive outside of Antarctica. Whereas most glaciers only calve at a rate of approximately a metre/three feet a day, the Ilulissat glacier moves forward at a rate of 25 metres per day, producing more than 10% of all icebergs in Greenland. These facts, together with the fjord’s unforgettable scenery, have secured the Ice fjord a place on UNESCO’s World Heritage List.

During the more than 250 years that have passed since the establishment of Ilulissat, the town has steadily flourished. Today, Ilulissat is Greenland’s third largest town, with more than 4,500 inhabitants. The legendary Arctic explorer, Knud Rasmussen was born in Ilulissat.

During the visit, if the weather allows, you will have the opportunity to join a boat trip to the Ice fjord (optional excursion). The journey takes about two and a half hours in total, and offers a great opportunity to take a closer look at the amazing ice-sculpted scenery.

If a hike or a trip by boat does not present enough excitement, there is also an opportunity to arrange a flight excursion in a fixed wing aircraft over the Ice fjord (optional excursion).

Please note the boat and flight excursions to the Ice fjord are not included in the general tour price. Refer to Price Information for more details.

In the evening, we should cruise southward, leaving lovely Disko Bay behind us as we part.

Albatros Expedition Disko Bay
Ocean Albatros
Ocean Albatros Exterior

Kangerlussuaq

Fulmars, auks and guillemots will accompany us south as we approach Kangerlussuaq. Our final day at sea offers the ideal opportunity to edit photos, share experiences with your fellow travelers and reflect on our experiences in the far reaches of the Arctic.

Our lecturers onboard will deliver inspiring and enriching presentations relevant to our voyage, and in the evening, join the Captain and officers of the Ocean Albatros for the Farewell Cocktail Party, followed a slideshow with all the memories and highlights from our voyage made by our onboard Photographer. A copy of the photos and other media will be forwarded to all guests after departure.

Albatros Expedition wake of Eric the red
Ocean Albatross

During the night, we will sail up the 160-kilometer/100 mile Kangerlussuaq Fjord. After breakfast aboard the ship, we will bid farewell to the ship's crew shuttling ashore by Zodiac.

Due to Kangerlussuaq’s military history and present-day role as an important air travel hub, Kangerlussuaq remains fairly isolated from Greenland’s rich cultural traditions, in comparison to other regions. While you still find cultural experiences when visiting Kangerlussuaq, the most impressive attraction is the surrounding nature, which is just beckoning to be explored. The town itself was largely constructed by the American military in the 1950s, and this small airport town has retained something of its Cold War atmosphere. Your Arctic adventure and time in Greenland concludes as we board the flight from Kangerlussuaq back to Reykjavik, Iceland.

Info

Single Cabin Supplement

When booking online, you can choose the option to "Upgrade to single occupancy". This will guarantee you the whole cabin to yourself, for an additional fee. If you don't select this option, then another traveler of the same sex might be placed into the same cabin with you.

What's included

Charter flight Copenhagen/Reykjavik to Kangerlussuaq, and Kangerlussuaq to Reykjavik/Copenhagen

Transfer to/from the port of Kangerlussuaq

14-day/13-night cruiseonboard Ocean Albatros in a shared double stateroom with private bathroom in the chosen category

English-speaking expedition team

Nature hikes and Zodiac cruises per itinerary

In-port town and settlement walks with the Expedition Team

Information briefings and lectures by Expedition Team

Full board onboard Ocean Albatros

Free coffee, tea and afternoon snacks onboard

Welcome and farewell cocktails

Taxes, tariffs and AECO fees

Special photo workshops

Digital visual journal link after the voyage, including voyage log, gallery, species list and more!

What's not included

Hotel accommodations pre- and post-cruise

Travel insurance

Cancellation insurance

Extra/optional excursions and activities not mentioned in the itinerary

Single room supplement

Meals not on board the ship

Beverages (other than coffee and tea)

Tips for the crew (we recommend USD 14 per person per day)

Personal expenses

Anything not mentioned under 'Inclusions'.

Reviews

Polar Latitudes Antarctica

Kaustav M.

Ocean Albatros Arctic and Antarctic cruises

Premium

I reached out to Polartours while researching options for an expedition cruise to Antarctica. I was impressed with their prompt and attentive follow-up! Natalya scheduled a video call immediately and while on the call took the time to carefully listen to my family's requirements and constraints. She then came back as promised within two days with a host of options for our consideration. Her follow through was terrific with relevant added details as needed and, of course, gentle reminders on looming deadlines. If the entire Polartours team is like her, you can do a lot worse than reaching out to them to plan out a once-in-a-lifetime adventure!

Aurora Expeditions Greg Mortimer Antarctic Explorer

Elsa

Ocean Albatros Arctic and Antarctic cruises

Premium

Great holiday (Copied from Swoop Antarctica)

FAQ

When it comes to traveling to Antarctica, one of the first questions that often arises is, "Can I fly to Antarctica?". The answer is: Yes, you can. Most trips start in Patagonia (Ushuaia and Punta Arenas) and cross the Drake Passage by ship, but there are also trips that use planes to cross that infamous sea passage. Here are the Pros and Cons for each method:

Flying to Antarctica:

  • Pros: Flying to Antarctica is the quickest way to reach the continent. It offers convenience and is often the choice for those with very limited time.

  • Cons: There are limited commercial flights to Antarctica, and these are primarily reserved for research and expedition purposes. Tourist accessibility is limited, and it can be costly. Also, as not many trips include flights, you'll be limiting your choice a lot if you decide to only look for such trips.

Crossing the Drake Passage by ship:

  • Pros: If you choose to cross the Drake Passage by ship, you embark on an incredible adventure. This journey is not just a means of transportation; it's an expedition in itself. The crossing takes 1.5 - 2 days, which are filled with scientific lectures that prepare you for the experience. You'll witness diverse wildlife, including penguins and whales, as your anticipation starts building up. To us, the crossing is a quintessential experience of a true Antarctic explorer.

  • Cons: Crossing the Drake Passage takes some time, and the seas can be rough. It's not the quickest way to reach the continent, and you need to allocate more time for your expedition.

In conclusion, when it comes to traveling to Antarctica, you have these two choices. Flying offers efficiency and direct access, perfect for specific purposes. Crossing the Drake Passage by ship provides an unmatched adventure and connection with Antarctica's unique environment. Consider what truly matters to you, and you'll find the Antarctic transportation choice that suits your goals and spirit of exploration.

All cruises in the polar regions operate to itineraries that are more-or-less fixed. We say "more or less", because wildlife (breeding, seasonality) and weather always play an important role in routing. Most cruises will offer a range of land-based and water-based activities that you will enjoy at various points in your cruise, including:

  • Land excursions (including hiking trails, visitor centers, time relaxing on beaches, observing animals, etc.)
  • Bird Watching
  • Snorkeling (from ship or beaches)
  • Dinghy rides
  • Kayaking
  • Diving (on ships with diving itineraries)
  • Naturalist presentations. These usually take place every evening - on board the bigger ships also with help of projectors, microscopes etc.

All boats carry English speaking, scientifically trained guides. They will lead you on your excursions, allowing you to learn as much as possible about the unique wildlife and habitats of the Polar Regions.

Choosing the right ship for a cruise to Antarctica or the Arctic seems difficult, but it doesn't have to be. Our fleet is over 30 vessels, we are sure that there is the perfect one for you. Please, follow these simple steps, and you will be able to find your ideal ship:

  • Determine your budget and desired level of comfort: Are you looking for luxury or more budget-friendly options? On our website you can set the price range.
  • Consider ship size: Large ships offer more amenities and facilities, but they can also feel crowded and impersonal. Smaller ships offer a more personal experience, but may not have as many amenities.
  • Look at the cabins: Although you probably won’t spend much time in your cabin, look at the photos and read the descriptions to make sure you're happy with the one you choose.
  • Consider the activities on board: Are you interested in kayaking, camping, diving or a photography workshop? Or maybe you want to take part in a Citizen Science Program? These activities can enhance your overall experience. See what our ships have to offer.
  • Read customer reviews: Learn about other travelers' experiences by reading reviews.
  • Ask your Polar Specialist: Feel free to contact your Polar Specialist. They are happy to share their knowledge and are always ready to help.

In addition: We work with responsible partners who provide a great experience for their passengers. All of our providers are committed to sustainability and to preserving the beauty of the polar regions. You don’t need to worry about the impact of your cruise, because we’ve already taken care of it.

We love to help people find their dream vacation to the Arctic and Antarctic. Whether you give us a call, contact us via email, or use our website inquiry form, one of our Polar travel experts will be more than happy to answer any questions, recommend ships and itineraries, and walk you through the whole process!

Step 1: Find your perfect trip. If you have already started looking for Polar Cruises, you will have quickly noticed that the sheer amount of options can be quite overwhelming. To help you navigate the countless departures and itineraries that our fleet offers, we have put together a great filter page for Antarctic and Arctic Expedition Cruises. Use this page to filter all trips by price, date, ship category, and even destinations you wish to visit. We update all dates, prices, and availabilities daily, and are proud to host what is doubtlessly the world's most complete collection of information.

Step 2: Found something you love? We'll hold your spaces, free of charge! If you find a cruise you like, you can either inquire directly with us or make an unbinding booking online. We will then reach out to the shipowners to put a hold on your spaces for a limited time, free of charge. Once we have confirmed your block with the ship, we will send you a written confirmation of your reservation and include full payment details in an invoice. Typically, we are able to hold unpaid reservations for up to 1 week*. This gives us time to clarify all your remaining questions, and also ensures that no other passengers can book your spaces, while we continue our conversation.

Step 3: Confirm your booking. In order to confirm your booking, we ask for a deposit payment. You can pay via bank transfer or credit card. Keep in mind, that we can only hold your spaces for a limited amount of time. If we don't receive your payment after this time, we can no longer guarantee that the places will be available or that the price won't increase. To prevent disappointment, we will automatically cancel your reservation if we don't receive your deposit by the due date stated on your booking reservation.

Step 4: Booking confirmation & Payment. As soon as we have received your deposit and a completed passenger information form, we will be pleased to send your booking confirmation and updated invoice, along with your trip itinerary, important information, and other great tips for your cruise.

Step 5: Final payment. In your initial invoice, we will define a final payment date by when you need to pay us the remaining amount of your trip. Once we have received your final payment we'll send you your cruise documents and voucher. As your trip approaches, we make sure to pass along all necessary information, so you feel super prepared and stress-free.

*For last-minute bookings, we might not be able to hold your spaces for so long. We will also require the full payment of your cruise upon booking.

An expedition cruise to Antarctica or the Arctic is a big deal! Most people plan for this type of trip at least 8 months in advance. This means the earlier you book, the better chance you'll have to reserve your prefered cabins. Early bird discounts are also popular and a great way to get 10-30% off your cruise.

Most expedition cruises offer optional activities like camping and kayaking, but the spaces are limited. A cruise with 120 passengers can have only 10-15 spaces for kayaking. These are reserved on a first come first served basis. The earlier you book, the higher your chance of grabbing a spot.

Even though last minute deals do occur, keep in mind that the airline prices will be much higher if you purchase them last minute. You may save a few hundred on your cruise, but you may end up paying the most for airfare.

If you are prone to motion sickness then here are a few hints to help you.

Firstly, book a cabin in the middle of the ship. The middle of the ship will move less, both in roll and in pitch. Secondly, chose a larger ship. Bigger vessels typically are more stable, and some of them are even equipped with "stabilizers", fins under water that remove the rolling in the swells. Thirdly, take medical advice on anti-seasickness medication. Some traditional remedies are said to be very effective, such as taking ginger or using commercially-available acupressure wristbands.

Watch this informative video about life onboard an expedition ship and seasickness from our expert guide and Polartours Brand Ambassador, Kevin.

Life Onboard & Seasickness
Far North Greenland Expedition

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Price

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