Ushuaia Cruise Ship

Classic Ushuaia

An exciting expedition cruise to the Antarctic Peninsula & South Shetland Islands.

Classic Ushuaia

On board the Ushuaia
10-day cruise
Antarctic Cruise
100 Reviews
5/5
Medical Service Icon
Medical Services
24h Doctor Station
Landing at penguin colonies and research stations and observing various different species of whales, seals, penguins and seabirds.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 1, PM
Embarking ship
Embark
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 1, PM
Beagle Channel
Sail the Beagle Channel & Lectures
The Beagle Channel is a strait in Tierra del Fuego Archipelago on the extreme southern tip of South America between Chile and Argentina. The Beagle Channel is about 240 kilometres (130 nmi; 150 mi) long and is about 5 kilometres (3 nmi; 3 mi) wide at its narrowest point. It extends from Nueva Island in the east to Darwin Sound and Cook Bay of the Pacific Ocean in the west. Some 50 kilometres (27 nmi; 31 mi) from its western end it divides into two branches, north and south of Gordon Island. The southwest branch between Hoste Island and Gordon Island enters Cook Bay. The northwest branch between Gordon Island and Isla Grande enters Darwin Sound connecting to the Pacific Ocean by the O'Brien Channel and the Ballenero Channel. The biggest settlement on the channel is Ushuaia in Argentina followed by Puerto Williams in Chile. These are two of the southernmost settlements of the world.
Day 2, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
King George Island
King George Island
At just 120 kilometers from the Antarctic Peninsula and the only airport in the South Shetlands, it is the connection between “real life” and “Antarctic life”. More than 10 different nations have year-round or summer-only scientific research stations on the island (considering that 90% of the island is covered in snow and ice, that is quite an achievement!). Maintaining a base on the island allows membership of the Antarctic Treaty. There is even a Russian Orthodox church, with a permanent on-site priest. The island might be home to a few international scientists, but they are very much outnumbered by the diverse wildlife that considers King George Island rightfully theirs.
Day 4, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Turret Point
Turret Point
Topography: Turret Point is marked by conspicuous rock stacks that form the eastern limit of King George Bay west of Three Sisters Point. There is a cobble beach on the southern coast and melt pools inland. The beach gently slopes to an extensive, heavily crevassed glacier. Potential Impact: Trampling of vegetation en route to the glacier and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 2 ships per day (midnight to midnight).* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: along an exposed broad cobble beach to the south, which may be packed with ice.<br /><br />Secondary: to the west. If this is used, be sure to stay clear of nesting sites for southern giant petrel at both ends of the beach (Closed Areas A and B).<br /> Closed Area: Closed Area A: Biodiverse fragile area including nesting southern giant petrels, kelp gulls, chinstrap penguins, blue-eyed shags and elephant seals wallows.<br />Closed Area B: Nesting southern giant petrels.<br />Closed Area C: Elevated area above the beach with nesting southern giant petrels.<br /> Guided Walking Area: Visitors to the glacier should be guided in small groups following the streambed to avoid trampling of vegetation. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely, but under supervision, between the landing beaches, avoiding the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation. Cautionary Notes: While weather conditions can change rapidly anywhere in the Antarctic, this location is particularly prone to such changes.
Day 4, PM
Penguin Island Map
Penguin Island
Penguin Island was first record in 1820 during a British expedition. It was so-named because of the vast numbers of penguins that could be seen along its shoreline from the ship as it passed by. Penguin Island lies just off the south coast of the much bigger King George Island. It’s ice-free and is oval-shaped, some 1 mile long. It’s standout geological feature is the 560ft tall Deacon Peak - a volcanic cone that is though to have last been active about 300 years ago. Penguin Island is an internationally-recognised important area for birds. As well as colonies of Adelie and Chinstrap penguins, the island is also home to large breeding colonies of southern giant petrels, antarctic terns and kelp gulls. You can often see Weddell seals and sometimes southern elephant seals on the beaches here, too. For those feeling fit, there is a marked path that will take you up to the top of Deacon Peak. This offers unparalleled views over the whole island and beyond across King George Bay. Do note, however, that this part of the antarctic is known for its quickly changing weather, so if the opportunity to presents itself, take it!
Day 5, AM
Northeast Beach map
Northeast beach of Ardley Island
Ardley Island is a small, rocky island about a mile long. It was first charted in 1935 but mistaken for a headland. It was not until aerial surveys years later that it was reclassified as an island. Ardley Island is an active summer research station, and you will often see scientists and researchers at work here. The huts that you can see from the beach are part of the research station and not able to be visited. The landing on the beach is just below the lighthouse, a distinctive feature that you will have spotted from out to see. This gently sloping cobble beach is the only place that visitors can arrive on Ardley. Visitor number are restricted due to the importance of the island as a breeding site for antarctic bird species. During your excursion on the island you will see a large gentoo penguin colony, as well as lesser numbers of Adelie and chinstrap penguins. You can also see southern giant petrels, Wilson's petrels, black-bellied storm petrels, Cape petrels, skuas and Antarctic terns.
Day 5, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island is made up of the cone of an active shield volcano. It last erupted in 1969. Its flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbour, although Baily Point is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream forms a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving at a time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Point include Antarctic Fur Seals who regular haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Point.
Day 5, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Telefon Bay
Telefon Bay on Deception Island
Topography: At the easternmost end of Telefon Bay, a gently sloping beach leads to a broad shallow valley which rises sharply to a number of unnamed volcanic craters. These are up to 45m in depth, although they are slowly being filled in by sediment and ice. The prominent ash cliffs that form the east and west sides of the valley are remnants of an older crater that was modified during an eruption in 1967, which broadened the valley itself. Potential Impact: Erosion of paths on crater ridge. Disturbance of scientific equipment. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Landing Area: Beach immediately to the south-west of the crater. Guided Walking Area: Visitors will be guided up to the crater in small closely supervised groups, with one guide per group of 1-15. Visitors should be closely supervised at the crater edge. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision in the landing beach area. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Stick to established paths where possible and move in single file on steep slopes.Walk slowly and carefully close at the crater edge.Do not tread on vegetated areas which are susceptible to trampling.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. • Exercise extreme caution when approaching the steep edge of the crater lip. The soil is friable and may collapse underfoot. • If seals are hauled out on the beach, slow down before landing."
Day 6, AM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 6, AM
Astrolabe Island
Astrolabe Island
Topography: A 3-mile-long rocky island situated 14 miles (22.53 km) NW off of Cape Ducorps on the Trinity Peninsula. Beach on the northern shore of Astrolabe Island. A small fractured boulder field of weathered rocks lies on the path between the beach and the penguin colony. <br></br> Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Damage to fractured boulders field, repeated walking over the field will dislodge the plates of rock so that eventually the cracked boulder effect will be lost. <br></br> Landing Requirements: Max pax on board: 500. Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers. <br></br> Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00Comments: 50 visitors only at any one time on walk to chinstrap colony. <br></br> Landing Area: Primary landing site – either end of main crescent shaped beach on eastern side of small rocky peninsula, rocks behind the beach contain chinstrap penguin colony. Antarctic fur seals are likely to be present in late season making landing difficult. <br /><br />Secondary landing site - Opposite side of peninsula on the rocky shore below the penguin colony. Extreme caution should be taken on very slippery rocks.<br /> <br></br> Closed Area: Small area of fractured boulders on the walk from primary landing site to the penguin colony. Can be skirted on the lower rocks. <br></br> Guided Walking Area: Short walk from the beach up the rocks to chinstrap penguin colony, avoiding the closed area. Only 50 at a time on the walk, which should be marked and closely guided. Do not walk up into the scree slopes where birds are nesting. <br></br> Free Roaming Area: Visitors are free to roam on the upper shore of the long stony landing beach. <br></br> Behavior Ashore: Stay clear of - and do not venture on - slopes where chinstrap penguins are nesting.Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. <br></br> Cautionary Notes: "• Be careful of hidden rocks on approach to landing sites. Ice conditions on approach to the beach can change rapidly – extreme caution should be used in approaching and departing the island. • Be extremely careful walking on rocks, especially close to the secondary landing site, which are very slippery and covered in guano."
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Paulet Island
Paulet Island
Paulet Island is a striking sight. This circular rock is only 1 mile in diameter, yet it has a volcanic cone that rises to over 1100 feet at its center. First mapped in 1839, Paulet Island is home to a huge penguin colony. Some 100,000 breeding pairs of Adelie penguins live here, a truly remarkable sight and sound! You will also see other sea birds on your visit, including shags, snow petrels and kelp gulls. Another fascinating aspect of Paulet Island is the historic shelter that dates back to 1903. A Swedish ship was crushed by the ice pack nearby, and survivors of the wreck built a stone hut to shelter them from the harsh winter conditions. There is also a cairn built on the highest point of the island that they used to attract attention for any rescue. There is also a grave marker for one expedition member who did not survive. Because the island is so densely packed with wildlife, visitors will be escorted in small groups by experienced Antarctic guides. This ensures that the breeding birds are disturbed as little as possible, and that the shelter site is protected. Fur seals are often also seen on the shores here, and in the peak breeding season you may find that some of the walking trails around the island are closed due to the sheer numbers of wonderful creatures that choose to raise their young here.
Day 6, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff
Topography: 1.5km long cobble and ash beach rising increasingly steeply towards towering red-brown tuff cliffs, which are embedded with volcanic bombs. The cliffs are heavily eroded, resulting in loose scree and rock and ice falls on higher slopes and large, wind eroded boulders on the beach. At high water the beach area can be restricted. Permanent ice and tidewater glaciers surround the site to the east and west occasionally filling the beach with brash ice. Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Trampling of moss and lichen on moraine. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per calendar day, of which no more than 1 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: The eastern end of the beach, to the east of the three large boulders at the western end of the snow slope - protected by two reefs. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Kelp gull and Gentoo penguin colony in the boulder area behind the landing beach, extending from the three large boulders up the small gully running south-southeast behind the moraine ridge. <br />Closed Area B: From the edge of the Adélie penguin colony (close to the end of reef),including all the beach and up the slope encompassing the whole colony. <br /> Guided Walking Area: Visits to the edge of the Adélie penguin colony should be closely supervised. <br />Visits to the snow petrel nests on the slopes behind the penguin rookeries should be done in closely guided groups with a ratio of 1 guide to 5 visitors – where the guide knows the location of the nest in advance. A minimum distance of 20 metres should be kept from the nest. Care should be taken not to disturb loose rocks. <br />Glacial walking - The route along the snow covered ground on the edge of the moraine ridge to the east of the landing beach should be clearly marked, or guided. Visitors should conduct the walk in single file. <br /><br /> Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely along the main flat beach area between the landing site and the closed areas. Visitors should remain above the high tide mark as far as possible, leaving beach free for penguins to access the sea. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Take care not to disturb nesting sea birds.Visitors should remain above the high tide mark and at high water be aware it may be necessary to have visitors walk in small groups escorted by guides. Cautionary Notes: "Strong winds are a feature of this area, and pack and brash ice are frequently blown onto the beach area. Rock falls occur from the cliffs and steeper scree slopes. The primary landing beach may be crowded with wildlife. Landing beach is prone to swells from the north and the north-east. Hazardous rocks and reefs lie immediately off shore. Scientific equipment may be found in the area, take care not to disturb the equipment."
Day 7, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island is well-named! This narrow, rocky island has a low valley in the middle, with two peaks at either end. This gives it an uncanny “devil’s horns” look! Devil Island gives an opportunity for some photographing some breathtaking views. From the landing site you are greeted by some spectacular volcanic formations. From here, you can hike to the top of one of the peaks, which overlooks an Adelie penguin colony nestling below in a natural bowl formation. But the star of the show here is the remarkable 360 degree viewpoint you get from the top. Stunning antarctic vistas that you don’t want to miss, so ensure camera batteries are charged and spare memory cards are ready! From the high vantage point you might spot fur seals, crabeater seals, and a variety of seabirds. It really makes the short, but steep climb worth it. Your expert Antarctic guides will show you the way and point out any wildlife you may have missed.
Day 7, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour is a mile-wide cove on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first discovered by a Belgian Antarctic survey of 1898 and was then in regular use by whaling vessels in the early 1900s. The site is popular for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a beautiful location, providing stunning views. The exposed rocky shoreline contrasts with the permanent snow patches dotted on the higher ground above it. To the south, there is deep permanent snow and ice. Glaciers ring the harbour and steep peaks rise above. It’s glorious! The other reason to visit is the nesting colony of chinstrap penguins that have made their homes here. There’s a steep but safe hike up from the beach to the colony on higher ground. As well as the penguins, you will be rewarded with remarkable views of the bay, and the glacier that regularly calves into the waters.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Islands
Orne Islands
The Orne Islands are a cluster of small, low-lying rocky islands at the entrance to the Errera Channel. The largest island has moderate slopes leading to a rocky central ridge that has permanent snow banks. There are also three other small islets that make up the group. Your landing will be via a low rock platform on the north-west side of the main island. Once ashore, you can roam freely around the island under the supervision of your expert guides. The Orne Islands are home to Skuas, which nest in the rocky outcrops here, as well as other Antarctic seabirds and penguins. In winter, impressive snow cliffs can form near the landing site. To avoid disturbing the wildlife, numbers on the island are restricted, and during nesting seasons your guides may restrict the areas in which you can roam to protect nests.
Day 8, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 9, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 10, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 10, PM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark and Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

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Your ship: Ushuaia

Welcome aboard the Ushuaia, a charming expedition cruise ship built for an unforgettable adventure in the Antarctic. This intimate cruise ship comfortably accommodates 90 passengers. Originally made for the United States agency NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration), the Ushuaia is a class 1C polar vessel, constructed with expedition in mind. This cruise ship offers plenty of deck space and a unique open bridge policy, where the Ushuaia officers encourage each passenger to observe the navigational operations of the ship. During your Ushuaia Antarctic cruise, a specialist team of international expedition leaders guide you through each excursion with knowledge, passion, and great care for the environment. Take advantage of the amazing wildlife and spectacular scenery on an Ushuaia Antarctic cruise. The Ushaia cabins are comfortable and roomy, equipped with ample storage space. Your friendly stewardess will make your cabin every morning with your preferences in mind. With the options of suite, premier twin and standard cabins, the Ushuaia is built to suit a range of comfort levels. The public areas abroad the Ushuaia feature a large dining room that seats all 90 passengers, an inviting observation lounge, a lecture theater with modern multimedia equipment, a fully-stocked bar, and a library which features a great selection of international titles, with an emphasis on reference material essential to your Antarctic voyage. A variety of games, including playing cards and board games, are also at your disposal. To guarantee an eventful cruise aboard the Ushuaia, your trip will be directed by a crew of Expedition Leaders, staff assistants, zodiac drivers, and lecturers. These hand-picked knowledgeable crew members will accompany you throughout the duration of your Ushuaia Antarctic expedition. They are responsible for leading safe and exciting shore excursions and giving interesting lectures on the incredible Antarctic flora and fauna. The Ushuaia Expedition Team will brief you daily about the following day’s expedition during an informal cocktail hour. The Ushuaia carries a full fleet of zodiacs, that can accommodate up to 12 passengers, allowing you to explore some of Antarctica’s most unique and otherwise inaccessible regions. Get ready for numerous wildlife sighting opportunities!

Amenities

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Gift Shop
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Observation Lounge
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Library
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Zodiac Fleet

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.

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