An Antarctica Cruise with Polartours on board the G Expedition

Ushuaia to Buenos Aires

From spotting rare and diverse wildlife to cruising through glaciers and icebergs, an otherworldly experience is guaranteed.

Ushuaia to Buenos Aires

On board the Silver Wind
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Isn’t it time you fell in love with Antarctica? That you ticked off the final continent on your bucket list. Well, now is the time to do it. But not only does this voyage offer an in depth visit to the peninsula, but it takes you to the islands of Argentina and the Falklands as well. From spotting rare and diverse wildlife to cruising through glaciers and icebergs, an otherworldly experience is guaranteed.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 1, PM
Embarking ship
Embark
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 2, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, PM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
South Georgia
South Shetland Islands
The South Shetland Islands are located just north of the Antarctic Peninsula. Weather and ice conditions permitting, our goal is to attempt memorable shore landings daily and encounter gentoo, chinstrap, and Adélie penguin rookeries; Weddell, crabeater, and leopard seals; and orca, humpback, and minke whales in the cold Antarctic waters. The ship will attempt to reach the Antarctic Peninsula for a landing, weather and ice-permitting. The peninsula also has a remarkable human history; during the voyage we will learn about some of the most important and dramatic expeditions to this remote corner of the world.
Day 4, PM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 5, AM
Astrolabe Island
Astrolabe Island
Topography: A 3-mile-long rocky island situated 14 miles (22.53 km) NW off of Cape Ducorps on the Trinity Peninsula. Beach on the northern shore of Astrolabe Island. A small fractured boulder field of weathered rocks lies on the path between the beach and the penguin colony. <br></br> Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Damage to fractured boulders field, repeated walking over the field will dislodge the plates of rock so that eventually the cracked boulder effect will be lost. <br></br> Landing Requirements: Max pax on board: 500. Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers. <br></br> Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00Comments: 50 visitors only at any one time on walk to chinstrap colony. <br></br> Landing Area: Primary landing site – either end of main crescent shaped beach on eastern side of small rocky peninsula, rocks behind the beach contain chinstrap penguin colony. Antarctic fur seals are likely to be present in late season making landing difficult. <br /><br />Secondary landing site - Opposite side of peninsula on the rocky shore below the penguin colony. Extreme caution should be taken on very slippery rocks.<br /> <br></br> Closed Area: Small area of fractured boulders on the walk from primary landing site to the penguin colony. Can be skirted on the lower rocks. <br></br> Guided Walking Area: Short walk from the beach up the rocks to chinstrap penguin colony, avoiding the closed area. Only 50 at a time on the walk, which should be marked and closely guided. Do not walk up into the scree slopes where birds are nesting. <br></br> Free Roaming Area: Visitors are free to roam on the upper shore of the long stony landing beach. <br></br> Behavior Ashore: Stay clear of - and do not venture on - slopes where chinstrap penguins are nesting.Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. <br></br> Cautionary Notes: "• Be careful of hidden rocks on approach to landing sites. Ice conditions on approach to the beach can change rapidly – extreme caution should be used in approaching and departing the island. • Be extremely careful walking on rocks, especially close to the secondary landing site, which are very slippery and covered in guano."
Day 5, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff
Topography: 1.5km long cobble and ash beach rising increasingly steeply towards towering red-brown tuff cliffs, which are embedded with volcanic bombs. The cliffs are heavily eroded, resulting in loose scree and rock and ice falls on higher slopes and large, wind eroded boulders on the beach. At high water the beach area can be restricted. Permanent ice and tidewater glaciers surround the site to the east and west occasionally filling the beach with brash ice. Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Trampling of moss and lichen on moraine. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per calendar day, of which no more than 1 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: The eastern end of the beach, to the east of the three large boulders at the western end of the snow slope - protected by two reefs. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Kelp gull and Gentoo penguin colony in the boulder area behind the landing beach, extending from the three large boulders up the small gully running south-southeast behind the moraine ridge. <br />Closed Area B: From the edge of the Adélie penguin colony (close to the end of reef),including all the beach and up the slope encompassing the whole colony. <br /> Guided Walking Area: Visits to the edge of the Adélie penguin colony should be closely supervised. <br />Visits to the snow petrel nests on the slopes behind the penguin rookeries should be done in closely guided groups with a ratio of 1 guide to 5 visitors – where the guide knows the location of the nest in advance. A minimum distance of 20 metres should be kept from the nest. Care should be taken not to disturb loose rocks. <br />Glacial walking - The route along the snow covered ground on the edge of the moraine ridge to the east of the landing beach should be clearly marked, or guided. Visitors should conduct the walk in single file. <br /><br /> Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely along the main flat beach area between the landing site and the closed areas. Visitors should remain above the high tide mark as far as possible, leaving beach free for penguins to access the sea. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Take care not to disturb nesting sea birds.Visitors should remain above the high tide mark and at high water be aware it may be necessary to have visitors walk in small groups escorted by guides. Cautionary Notes: "Strong winds are a feature of this area, and pack and brash ice are frequently blown onto the beach area. Rock falls occur from the cliffs and steeper scree slopes. The primary landing beach may be crowded with wildlife. Landing beach is prone to swells from the north and the north-east. Hazardous rocks and reefs lie immediately off shore. Scientific equipment may be found in the area, take care not to disturb the equipment."
Day 5, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island is well-named! This narrow, rocky island has a low valley in the middle, with two peaks at either end. This gives it an uncanny “devil’s horns” look! Devil Island gives an opportunity for some photographing some breathtaking views. From the landing site you are greeted by some spectacular volcanic formations. From here, you can hike to the top of one of the peaks, which overlooks an Adelie penguin colony nestling below in a natural bowl formation. But the star of the show here is the remarkable 360 degree viewpoint you get from the top. Stunning antarctic vistas that you don’t want to miss, so ensure camera batteries are charged and spare memory cards are ready! From the high vantage point you might spot fur seals, crabeater seals, and a variety of seabirds. It really makes the short, but steep climb worth it. Your expert Antarctic guides will show you the way and point out any wildlife you may have missed.
Day 6, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 6, AM
Cuverville Island
Cuverville Island
This small, steep-sided island is only 1.5 by 1.25 miles and two-thirds of it sits under a permanent ice-cap. On its northern shore is a pebble and boulder beach backed by steep cliffs where you will arrive by zodiac from your Antarctic cruise vessel and come ashore. At both ends of this beach are impressive Gentoo penguin colonies. You will be able to clearly see the trails they use to make their way too and from the water. There are other colonies and nesting sites on the higher ground behind the beach, and throughout the island. You can also see the evidence of the whaling activity that went on here in the early 1900s, including discarded whalebones and the remains of the equipment used to hall them ashore for processing. This small island is carefully protected - only one ship at a time may land passengers here and there are other restrictions to ensure the wildlife is not unnecessarily disturbed. Some areas of the island are closed to visitors, but the rest allows you to roam freely, and your expert guides will show you the resident flora and fauna, as well as explaining the island’s whaling history.
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Damoy Point
Damoy Point
Damoy Point is a rocky headland on the west coast of Wiencke Island.Topography: Damoy Point is a rocky isthmus off the west coast of Wiencke Island, Antarctic Peninsula. It’s key points of interest are two very well preserved expedition huts. The first, known as Damoy Hut, was built in 1973 and was used by the British Antarctic Survey as a summer air facility and a personnel transfer station, but hasn’t been used since 1973. The interior is in excellent condition, and almost looks as if it could be put back into use straight away. There are even tin cups hanging on the kitchen wall as if ready to give travel-weary scientists a restoring cup of tea! Just outside Damoy Hut is a refuge built by Argentina in the 1950s. This is not open to visitors, and is still in use as an emergency refuge should the need ever arise. Apart from these historic buildings, visitors will see genroo penguins who breed here, as well as plenty of seals and sea birds.
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Portal Point
Portal Point
Portal Point is a narrow, rocky point on the northeast of Reclus Peninsula. It was named by British explorers as it formed part of the “gateway” for the route to the Antarctic Plateau. In 1956, a refuge hut was established here, known as Cape Reclus Refuge. It was only used for two winters, and then abandoned. In 1996, the hut was removed and is now in the Falklands Island Museum. All that’s left of the refuge on the Point are the remains of its foundations, often not visible under the frequent snow cover. Indeed, this year-round snow is why there are no penguin colonies here. However, Portal Point is a popular place for Weddell seals to haul out, and while you are landing you will often see them in good numbers.
Day 7, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour is a mile-wide cove on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first discovered by a Belgian Antarctic survey of 1898 and was then in regular use by whaling vessels in the early 1900s. The site is popular for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a beautiful location, providing stunning views. The exposed rocky shoreline contrasts with the permanent snow patches dotted on the higher ground above it. To the south, there is deep permanent snow and ice. Glaciers ring the harbour and steep peaks rise above. It’s glorious! The other reason to visit is the nesting colony of chinstrap penguins that have made their homes here. There’s a steep but safe hike up from the beach to the colony on higher ground. As well as the penguins, you will be rewarded with remarkable views of the bay, and the glacier that regularly calves into the waters.
Day 7, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Islands
Orne Islands
The Orne Islands are a cluster of small, low-lying rocky islands at the entrance to the Errera Channel. The largest island has moderate slopes leading to a rocky central ridge that has permanent snow banks. There are also three other small islets that make up the group. Your landing will be via a low rock platform on the north-west side of the main island. Once ashore, you can roam freely around the island under the supervision of your expert guides. The Orne Islands are home to Skuas, which nest in the rocky outcrops here, as well as other Antarctic seabirds and penguins. In winter, impressive snow cliffs can form near the landing site. To avoid disturbing the wildlife, numbers on the island are restricted, and during nesting seasons your guides may restrict the areas in which you can roam to protect nests.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Wordie House
Wordie House, Winter Island
Nestled onto the only flat part of Winter Island, Wordie House is a hut built in 1947. It was named by a British Antarctic expedition of the time after James Wordie, who was the chief scientist on Shackleton’s famous 1914 Antarctic exploration. Before it closed in 1954, the hut was used to take meteorological readings using instruments stored inside special screens, one of which still stands today. These readings were among the most important and longest set of weather data ever recorded about the Antarctic, and helped scientists to a greater understanding of the meteorology of the continent. Wordie House was made a “Historic Site and Monument” in 1995 and has been looked after by the UK Antarctic Hertage Trust since 2009. There are almost 500 original artefacts still on the site, including original cans of coffee, records, pots and pans, plates, and more. This makes Wordie House a true time capsule from the golden age of Antarctic exploration and scientific research.The hut is now fully weathertight, and work continues on preserving this unique station. Visits to the site are managed by the nearby Ukrainian station Vernadsky, and you may well be briefed by the Base Commander or other official before you board your boats for the landing. Uniquely for such a historic site, visitors are allowed to roam freely under the supervision of their expert Antarctic guides. They will answer all your questions about the history of the hut, as well as the artifacts that you can find here. Visitors to Winter Island can also expect to see seabirds such as skuas and kelp gulls, seals and penguins.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Yalour Islands
Yalour Islands
The Yalour Islands are a 1.5-mile long group of small islands and protruding rocks. Most of the islands are steep-sided or unsuitable for landing due to sea conditions, but the largest island has some cobbled beaches where you can put ashore. Visitors come here to make the short climb up from the beach to the Adelie penguin breeding colonies. There are thought to be around 8,000 breeding pairs of Adelies in the Yalour Islands, and they have nested on every bit of rock they can find that’s not snow-covered. It makes for an amazing sight as you come in to land on the beach! Photographic opportunities here are excellent. The high mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula form a stunning backdrop to shots of the Adelie nest sites. Your expert guides will lead you around, showing you the best sites and answering all your questions about the penguins and their lives.
Day 7, PM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 8, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island is made up of the cone of an active shield volcano. It last erupted in 1969. Its flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbour, although Baily Point is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream forms a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving at a time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Point include Antarctic Fur Seals who regular haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Point.
Day 8, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Telefon Bay
Telefon Bay on Deception Island
Topography: At the easternmost end of Telefon Bay, a gently sloping beach leads to a broad shallow valley which rises sharply to a number of unnamed volcanic craters. These are up to 45m in depth, although they are slowly being filled in by sediment and ice. The prominent ash cliffs that form the east and west sides of the valley are remnants of an older crater that was modified during an eruption in 1967, which broadened the valley itself. Potential Impact: Erosion of paths on crater ridge. Disturbance of scientific equipment. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Landing Area: Beach immediately to the south-west of the crater. Guided Walking Area: Visitors will be guided up to the crater in small closely supervised groups, with one guide per group of 1-15. Visitors should be closely supervised at the crater edge. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision in the landing beach area. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Stick to established paths where possible and move in single file on steep slopes.Walk slowly and carefully close at the crater edge.Do not tread on vegetated areas which are susceptible to trampling.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. • Exercise extreme caution when approaching the steep edge of the crater lip. The soil is friable and may collapse underfoot. • If seals are hauled out on the beach, slow down before landing."
Day 9, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 10, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 11, AM
morning in Ushuaia
Morning in Ushuaia
Enjoy a free morning in Ushuaia. The morning before you embark on your Antarctic cruise is for you to visit the beautiful port city of Ushuaia.
Day 11, PM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 12, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 13, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 14, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 15, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 16, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 17, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 18, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 19, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 20, AM
Sail Falkland Islands
Sail to the Falkland Islands & Lectures
Enjoy the lecture and educational sessions about the extraordinary human and natural history of the Antarctic region. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 21, AM
Stanley
Stanley
Despite it being a stalwart of Britishness, Stanley more resembles Patagonia than Portsmouth. But, despite the windswept, vast and achingly beautiful landscape of the Falkland Islands, don’t be too surprised to find the odd pub serving ales and even fish’n’chips. While landmarks such as Christ Church Cathedral, with its whalebone arch are 100% local, there is a also good smattering of imported garden gnomes and Union Jacks to remind you whose territory you are really on. The Falkland Islands’ ownership has long been a matter of controversy, ever since colonisation in the 18th century. At various points in their life they have been considered French, British, Spanish and Argentine. The Falklands War in 1982, despite only lasting for a short while, proved that the Brits clung to this remote outpost and the islands remain part of the British Commonwealth today.
Day 22, AM
Westpoint Island
Westpoint Island
A north-westerly outpost of the scenic Falkland Islands, you'll be welcomed ashore by the calls and cries of a huge colony of black-browed albatross. Indeed, the island was originally known as Albatross Island before being renamed to reflect its geographic location. While the albatrosses - that flash white feathers in the rugged cliffs above the waves - are the most well known residents, they are far from the only animal inhabitants of this remote, isolated land. A huge army of birdlife calls the island sanctuary home, overwhelming the tiny human population and sheep that roam West Point Island's grasses. Meet the rockhopper penguins who scamper and burrow along the coast's boulders, as well as the imperial cormorants who rest here in great numbers. You're also likely to encounter Magellanic penguins during your explorations.
Day 22, PM
Saunders Island
Saunders Island
Sitting to the north-west of the Falkland’s archipelago, the British established their first settlement here in 1765, at Port Egmont. Remote, wild and wonderful, the island now serves as a lush grazing ground for plenty of sheep - but it's an astonishing place to encounter far rarer animals - from elephant seals to silvery grebes and Peale’s dolphins. Connected by sinewy links of beach and sandy dunes, which create some of the most dramatic scenery in the Falklands, the archipelago’s fourth biggest island is home to its best birdlife - including a colony of neatly tuxedoed king penguins. Saunders Island's topography tightens at The Neck - where you'll find even more penguin activity. Colonies squark and chatter in huge crowds here, with Gentoo, Rockhopper and Magellanic penguins dipping into the water, and clambering over boulders.
Day 23, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 24, AM
Puerto Deseado
Puerto Deseado
A wildlife lover’s paradise, Charles Darwin wrote that he had never seen such a secluded place, as he first explored the incredible estuary of Puerto Deseado. Darwin visited on several occasions as his evolution theories took shape, and the diverse, extraordinary wildlife continues to lure visitors to this small fishing town, set amid Argentina’s wild Patagonia region. Darwin’s name is imprinted deep into the folds of this city's history, and whether it’s on café signs or adventure tour guides’ literature, the great naturalist’s name is never far away. Discover the impressive flora and fauna of the region for yourself, with a boat ride on the Deseado River’s winding flow - which culminates at the spectacular estuary. Forming a beautiful nature reserve, tiny Commerson's dolphins mill in the salty water of this immense, drowned river valley - which cuts into the rusty terrain, and wind-shaped scenery.
Day 25, AM
Camarones
Camarones
If you have ever fantasised about running away from the rat race, then Camerones is the perfect place to pitch up. Life is lived in the slow lane here; locals are languid and proud of it, penguins waddle and skip along the shore and the glorious expense of coastline thunders on much as it has done for centuries. That is not to say that life is lazy. Camarones literally translates as “prawns” so, as the name suggests, fishing is a high energy activity that accounts for much of the local economy. Cooking the spoils of the catch of the day accounts for the rest so don’t miss a chance to enjoy some of the best seafood that Argentina has to offer. Washed down with some excellent Malbec, Camarones’ flagship wine, of course! The city’s claim to fame is that Juan Domingo Perón lived here during his childhood, and a small museum dedicated to the political leader can be found in the city centre.
Day 26, AM
Puerto Madryn
Puerto Madryn
Overlooking the vast Golfo Nuevo, the northern Patagonian town of Puerto Madryn is one of Argentina’s top whale-watching spots. Founded by Welsh explorers, who arrived aboard the Mimosa ship in 1865, Puerto Madryn welcomes visitors to enjoy its wonderful wildlife, traditional tea shops, and sheep-rearing ranches known as estancias. Taste some of Argentina’s tenderest and juiciest steak cuts, or piles of seafood, in the waterfront restaurants of the town’s promenade, as you fuel up ahead of the natural adventures of a lifetime. An astonishing array of animals call the protected Valdes Peninsula home. See penguins wandering, sea lions yawning lazily, and playful guanacos galloping here. Head to the beaches of Estancia San Lorenzo, to hear the racket made by hundreds of Magellan penguins.
Day 27, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 28, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Day 29, AM
Buenos Aires
Arrival to Buenos Aires
Passionate, and alive with an infectious crackling energy, the Argentine capital is a breathlessly romantic city, which blends old-world colonial architecture with a down-to-earth Latin American glamour. Famed for steamy tango interplays, and expertly seared steak slabs, a visit to Buenos Aires is a fiery fiesta for the senses. Parque Tres de Febrero is a 400-hectare oasis where 18,000 rose bushes bloom, and skyscrapers give way to still lakes and pretty paths of rollerblading locals. Mighty palm trees - that look like exploding fireworks - stand tall in Plaza de Mayo, the heart of this sprawling cosmopolitan capital of 48 barrios. The square has served as the stage for many fundamental events in this country’s history, and the location where the seeds of independence were sewn continues to serve as the city’s gathering point - and is a place for solidarity, rebellion and revolution.
Day 30, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark & Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

Where you will be

Dates & Prices

Select date and passengers
Number of passengers
2

Your ship: Silver Wind

Welcome aboard the Silver Wind, an elegant and versatile ship perfectly suited for your Arctic and Antarctic cruise. The Silver Wind underwent a major upgrade in 2018 and a second one in 2020, where it benefited from a new and improved ice-class hull. This strongly reinforced hull will make the Silver Wind one of the most adaptable cruise ships in the Silversea fleet. The service aboard the Silver Wind cruises are exquisite, with a total of 239 crew members ready and eager to serve a maximum of 274 passengers. Her timeless features and luxuriously relaxed atmosphere will make your Arctic or Antarctic cruise experience one to remember. The variety of suite options available on the Silver Wind suit all types of comfort levels. Each suite includes a fully equipped mini bar, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet, a bathrobe and slippers, Italian linens and for your personal preference, a selection of pillows and toiletries to choose from. Many of these beautiful suites come with balconies and range from 240 sq feet (ca. 22 m²) to the largest Owner’s Suite at 587sq feet (ca. 55 m²). The atmosphere aboard the Silver Wind Arctic or Antarctic cruises is international. English is the main language spoken, however, you will most likely meet passengers from all over the world. The mood is sophisticated and tranquil, appropriate for any guest to enjoy. The daytime dress code is casual, as the polar regions require suitable clothing. And within a 7-day cruise, you will be able to participate in one formal night. It is recommended ladies wear a cocktail or evening dress, while gentlemen wear a dark suit or tuxedo. Despite its intimate size, the Silver Wind offers a variety of amenities and entertainment options. Make your Polar cruise a perfect one with a full range of spa treatments at the Zagara Beauty Spa. Relax in the outdoor heated swimming pool, or try your luck at the Casino. The Silver Wind cruises also offer free fitness classes including Yoga, and Pilates as well as a small gym. Passengers of all ages can enjoy the Sports center equipped with a jogging track, a golf cage, paddle tennis, and a putting green. For those looking for a more educational experience during their Arctic or Antarctic cruise on board the Silver Wind, visit the beautiful Parisian Show Lounge for daily lectures as well as Trivia games, language lessons, live music, and more. The Library also offers audio-listening stations and on-demand movies. Make sure you head to the Observation Lounge for a 270-degree panoramic view of the incredible Polar horizons. Lastly, adults can enjoy the smoking lounge at the Connoisseur’s Corner, furnished with leather armchairs where one can purchase vintage wines, cognacs, and fine cigars.

Amenities

Cocktail Symbol
Bar
Casino Icon
Casino
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
Spa Icon
Spa
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Connoisseur's Corner Icon
Connoisseur's Corner
photo studio icon
Photo Studio
Observation Lounge Icon
Observation Lounge
Library Icon
Library
Conference room icon
Conference Room

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
The Silver Wind goes at lengths in order to...

Food & Drinks

The dining options aboard the Silver Wind cruises are nothing short of delicious. Your Arctic or Antarctic cruise will not be complete without tasting all the different flavors the ship has to offer. The Restaurant, an open-seating dining room, offers gourmet Mediterranean meals. Make a dinner reservation at Le Champagne, and enjoy signature French cuisine in an intimate setting. La Terraza is a complimentary buffet-style restaurant offering both indoor and outdoor seating. La Terraza transforms into a reservation-only Italian fare at dinnertime. The Pool Bar & Pool Grill serve fast food and drinks in the pool deck area. In the evening, the area is converted into an al fresco dining experience with classic seafood and steakhouse choices. The Grill offers gourmet dining under the stars. Its signature dishes include lava-rocks grilled meat, seafood, Mediterranean vegetables, and more. The “Black Rock Grill Experience” is a fun hands-on dining concept allowing guests to cook their own meat and seafood. Last but not least, the Bar offers passengers ample comfortable seating and complimentary cocktails. Enjoy live music performances, and for those brave enough, a dance floor. The best part? The all-inclusive Silversea package also includes gratuities. Tipping is included!