An Antarctica Cruise on board the G Expedition with Polartours

Buenos Aires to Ushuaia Solar Eclipse

Prepare for one of the world’s most phenomenal phenomenons with the total lunar eclipse of 2021

Buenos Aires to Ushuaia Solar Eclipse

On board the Silver Wind
23-day cruise
Antarctic Cruise
solar eclipse
100 Reviews
5/5
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West Point Island, Falkland Islands – Look for Commerson’s and Peale’s dolphins while approaching the settlement of West Point Island, where just one family lives. Hike to a Black-browed Albatross colony next to Rockhopper Penguins and Imperial Cormorants. Visit the home of the owners for some tea and home-baked cakes and cookies. Stanley, Falkland Islands – Explore Stanley, the Falkland Islands’ capital. See the whalebone arch in front of the Anglican Cathedral, or walk the streets and have a beer at one of the charming local pubs. The Historic Dockside Museum is also worth a visit, covering the natural and cultural history of the region. South Georgia – In South Georgia we will land at old whaling stations, depending on landing conditions hope to visit a huge King Penguin colony, see the Museum at Grytviken, and do Zodiac cruises looking for wildlife. Total Eclipse – This Total Solar Eclipse can only be seen from Antarctica. We will sail from South Georgia to reach an area north of the South Orkney Islands to hopefully observe the eclipse during the early morning. Elephant Island, Antarctica – If conditions cooperate, you might take a Zodiac cruise to see where Sir Ernest Shackleton’s men were stranded for more than four months. A bust here commemorates the Chilean captain who finally helped Shackleton rescue the men in mid-winter. Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica – We will explore the Antarctic Peninsula from the Silver Wind, on Zodiac cruises and via landings to see seals and penguin colonies. These activities will be expertly selected by your Captain and Expedition Leader while working with the weather and ice conditions. This promontory of land is the furthest-north extension of the Antarctic mainland. South Shetland Islands, Antarctica – Several landing sites and remains of whaling stations can be found in the South Shetland Islands. This grouping of islands is 75 miles north of the Antarctic Peninsula and holds many research stations run by Argentina, the US, Chile, Spain and other countries. Sites to be seen will be selected based on weather and ice conditions. Kayaking – Weather depending, Silver Wind offers the opportunity to kayak in a small group under the guidance of certified kayak instructors. These special expeditionary excursions are a chance to appreciate the wilds of the Falkland Islands, South Georgia and Antarctica in a peaceful silence. Cultural Highlights: Meet the residents of West Point Island and see the capital of the Falkland Islands at Stanley Port. Learn about the cultural and natural history of the region at the Historic Dockside Museum.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Buenos Aires
Arrival at Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires always feels alive with positive energy. It’s a capital city that combines Latin flair and vibrancy with colonial-era romantic architecture, modern living, and always a hint of sensuality. There’s plenty to get hot about here - whether it’s a steamy tango or a sizzling steak! From a walk amid the skyscrapers of modern Buenos Aires to a stroll around the Parque Tres de Febrero and its 18,000 rose bushes, there’s something for everyone. Enjoy the huge palm trees that stand in the Plaza de Mayo, the scene of many of the country’s most important moments, and where the sparks of revolution were ignited. Experience a huge range of fantastic international-quality restaurants. Soak up the vibes of artists and musicians as you stroll through the brightly colored buildings of La Boca, or visit one of the many art galleries and museums, both old and new. South America’s second-largest city, Buenos Aires is the perfect place to start or finish your Antarctic experience, and provides a striking contrast to the wilderness you have experienced, or are about to...
Day 1, PM
Disembark & goodbyes
Embark in Buenos Aires
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 2, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days spent at sea are perfect for unwinding, relaxing, and doing as little or as much as you want to do. If fitness is your thing why not visit the ship’s gym? If you’re more into pampering, perhaps a spa treatment or two is all the energy you want to expend. Out on deck, you can look out for whales or dolphins and simply drink in the sights, sounds, and smells of the South Atlantic. Our advice is to take advantage of these relaxed days - you’ll soon be enjoying long and busy days of Antarctic exploration and adventure!
Day 3, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days spent at sea are perfect for unwinding, relaxing, and doing as little or as much as you want to do. If fitness is your thing why not visit the ship’s gym? If you’re more into pampering, perhaps a spa treatment or two is all the energy you want to expend. Out on deck, you can look out for whales or dolphins and simply drink in the sights, sounds, and smells of the South Atlantic. Our advice is to take advantage of these relaxed days - you’ll soon be enjoying long and busy days of Antarctic exploration and adventure!
Day 4, AM
Puerto Madryn
Puerto Madryn
Puerto Madryn, in the northern part of Patagonia, is a whale-watching hotspot. This city of 100,000 people is protected from the pounding South Atlantic by the Golfo Nuevo. It grew from a tiny settlement built by Welsh immigrants in 1865, who gave it its Welsh name of Porth Madryn. This is a cheerful, bustling city with plenty of modern facilities for shopping, dining, and pleasure-seeking. But the true star of the show is the Golfo Nuevo and the creatures that make its waters and shores their home. This makes Puerto Madryn the perfect place to explore the area. The whole Valdes Peninsula supports an abundance of wildlife. From elephant seals, sea lions, and penguins, to whales and dolphins, and innumerable seabirds, the region teems with wonders. After a day of wildlife watching, what better way to recharge than with a superb local steak or some delicious seafood in one of Puerto Madryn’s many great restaurants?
Day 5, AM
Puerto Deseado
Puerto Deseado
When he visited this part of Patagonia, Charles Darwin wrote that he had never before seen such a secluded place as the estuary and surround of Puerto Deseado - then known as Port Desire. Something about the area caught his imagination, and he visited several more times during the period when his thoughts on evolution were beginning to form, drawn to the extraordinary and diverse wildlife he found. Now, more than 150 years on, it’s the same astonishing wildlife encounters that bring modern explorers to this fishing port of 15,000 inhabitants in this remote part of Argentina, with its 20-mile long natural harbor giving way to the Deseado estuary. Since 1977, this important area has been preserved as a protected area - the Reserva Natural Ría Deseado. A boat ride through the estuary is a must. Here you will encounter the small but striking Commerson’s Dolphin, with their distinctive black and white markings. Peale dolphins are also a regular sight. Magellanic and Patagonian penguins also make their homes here, as well as a huge number of bird species, including 5 different cormorants and 3 different oystercatchers.
Day 6, AM
Sail Falkland Islands
Sail to the Falkland Islands & Lectures
As you get to know your ship - finding those cozy corners to read, or the best spots on deck for whale watching - you'll also have the opportunity to learn from the onboard experts. Every ship carries a range of guides with specialties in wildlife, marine biology, geology, history, and more. They provide a program of informative and entertaining lectures and talks that help you to deepen your understanding of and appreciation for this remote yet wonderful region at the end of the Earth.
Day 7, AM
New Island
New Island
New Island - also known as Isla de Goicoechea in Spanish - is one of the Falkland Islands. A long, thin island with both steep cliffs and sandy bays, it’s 150 west of the Falkland’s capital, Stanley. Despite its position on the westerly edge of the islands, New Island was one of the first to be visited and colonized. There is some evidence that whalers from America may have landed here as early as 1770. In 1813 a ship from Nantucket was wrecked here and the crew survived for two years before being rescued. They built a simple stone shelter which now forms part of the oldest building in the Falklands. With stints as a base for guano miners and whaling companies, New Island proved to be uneconomical to exploit in these ways and was left for the wildlife to thrive. Now a wildlife reserve and registered Important Bird Area (IBA), New Island is a beautiful sanctuary for many Falklands and Antarctic species to breed and live. Penguins, in particular, take advantage of the shallow beaches and rolling shores on the eastern coast. Five species can be seen here, including large breeding colonies of gentoo and southern rockhopper penguins. King penguins are also found here, as well as petrels, shags, dolphin gulls, Falklands skuas, and many more. Sea lions and elephant seals can also be found hauled up on the beaches or swimming idly in the sheltered bays.
Day 7, PM
Westpoint Island
West Point Island
Well-named West Point Island is one of the furthest points in the northwest of the Falklands archipelago. Known originally as Albatross Island (and Isla Remolinos in Spanish), this 5.5 square miles of grassy rock has some of the most stunning scenery to be found in the islands. West Point is a working sheep farm and is owned by the Napier family, who will warmly welcome you to their home. As its original name implies, you’ll also be welcomed by the calls and shrieks from the huge colony of black-browed albatross that live here. In fact, more than two-thirds of the world’s entire albatross population breed here in the Falklands! But the highest cliffs and the biggest albatross colony aren’t the only things that await you on West Point. There is a large southern rockhopper penguin colony, as well as a smaller Magellanic penguin nest site. Other notable bird species include striated caracaras, Cobb's wrens, blackish cinclodes, and white-bridled finches. In fact, there are so many important species here that West Point Island has been formally listed as an Important Bird Area (IBA). The other thing you’ll get on West Point is fantastic Napier hospitality! Your group will be welcomed with traditional tea, cake, and biscuits as well as an invitation to walk around the island gardens.
Day 8, AM
Stanley
Stanley
Stanley (sometimes called Stanley) is the capital of the Falkland Islands and is quintessentially British - albeit reminiscent of a Britain from yesteryear. But there’s something remarkable about seeing the red “telephone boxes” and signs for “fish n chips” sitting in a landscape that’s more like Patagonia than the pastoral English countryside. Stanley is home to 70% of the Falklands’ population, about 2,500 people. There’s a gentle pace to life here, but if there’s a cruise ship or two in the harbor then it can feel quite lively! As well as pubs and “chippies” there are some definite signs that you’re not in Europe. Visit Christ Church Cathedral, opened in 1892, and you’ll enter through an arch built from the jaws of two huge blue whales. A stroll to Victory Green in central Stanley will bring you face to face with a mizzen mast from the original SS Great Britain. Brunel built the world’s first propeller-driven iron ship in 1843, and it was badly damaged by gales when rounding Cape Horn in 1886, limping back to the Falkland Islands where it lay abandoned for almost a century. Walk down Pioneer Row and you’ll see the original settlers’ cottages, not only still standing but in perfect condition. Originally shipped the 8,000 miles from the UK as kits, they were erected quickly by the first settlers to provide warmth and shelter from the sometimes forbidding weather. But no matter what other unique and unusual sites you see in this southern hemisphere town, the Union Jack flags flying and the garden gnomes in gardens won’t let you forget that this is a piece of Britain at the edge of the Antarctic.
Day 9, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
On the journey to South Georgia, your naturalist guides will entertain and educate you with a range of lectures about South Georgia, its wildlife, geology, and history. You'll also have plenty of time to be on deck - wrapped up warm, of course - watching as Antarctic bird species flying overhead, as well as spotting whales and other marine mammals as you approach the coast.
Day 10, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
On the journey to South Georgia, your naturalist guides will entertain and educate you with a range of lectures about South Georgia, its wildlife, geology, and history. You'll also have plenty of time to be on deck - wrapped up warm, of course - watching as Antarctic bird species flying overhead, as well as spotting whales and other marine mammals as you approach the coast.
Day 11, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island (known as Isla San Pedro in Spanish) is often described, quite rightly, as a highlight of many peoples’ Antarctic cruise experience. The remote, rocky main island is 850 miles from the Falkland Islands and the same distance from the Antarctic Peninsula. It’s quite mountainous, with a central high ridge and plenty of bays and fjords on its coast, making for some stunning views and remarkable photographs. There are 8 smaller islands (the South Sandwich Islands) located 400 miles to the southeast which are rarely visited. South Georgia has a human history mainly centered around the sealing and whaling industries, with relics such as try pots and sunken whaling ships to be discovered. Many people also pay a visit to the grave of Ernest Shackleton, one of the most famous Antarctic explorers, who died unexpectedly of a heart attack while in South Georgia. Part of one of the world’s largest marine reserves, the variety of the wildlife to be found in South Georgia is what attracts most of its visitors. From the world’s largest king penguin colonies to beaches crammed with elephant and fur seals, to breeding colonies of the bird with the largest wingspan in the world, the wandering albatross, to innumerable species of seabirds, South Georgia is a destination that serves up “days of a lifetime” every day!
Day 12, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island (known as Isla San Pedro in Spanish) is often described, quite rightly, as a highlight of many peoples’ Antarctic cruise experience. The remote, rocky main island is 850 miles from the Falkland Islands and the same distance from the Antarctic Peninsula. It’s quite mountainous, with a central high ridge and plenty of bays and fjords on its coast, making for some stunning views and remarkable photographs. There are 8 smaller islands (the South Sandwich Islands) located 400 miles to the southeast which are rarely visited. South Georgia has a human history mainly centered around the sealing and whaling industries, with relics such as try pots and sunken whaling ships to be discovered. Many people also pay a visit to the grave of Ernest Shackleton, one of the most famous Antarctic explorers, who died unexpectedly of a heart attack while in South Georgia. Part of one of the world’s largest marine reserves, the variety of the wildlife to be found in South Georgia is what attracts most of its visitors. From the world’s largest king penguin colonies to beaches crammed with elephant and fur seals, to breeding colonies of the bird with the largest wingspan in the world, the wandering albatross, to innumerable species of seabirds, South Georgia is a destination that serves up “days of a lifetime” every day!
Day 13, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island (known as Isla San Pedro in Spanish) is often described, quite rightly, as a highlight of many peoples’ Antarctic cruise experience. The remote, rocky main island is 850 miles from the Falkland Islands and the same distance from the Antarctic Peninsula. It’s quite mountainous, with a central high ridge and plenty of bays and fjords on its coast, making for some stunning views and remarkable photographs. There are 8 smaller islands (the South Sandwich Islands) located 400 miles to the southeast which are rarely visited. South Georgia has a human history mainly centered around the sealing and whaling industries, with relics such as try pots and sunken whaling ships to be discovered. Many people also pay a visit to the grave of Ernest Shackleton, one of the most famous Antarctic explorers, who died unexpectedly of a heart attack while in South Georgia. Part of one of the world’s largest marine reserves, the variety of the wildlife to be found in South Georgia is what attracts most of its visitors. From the world’s largest king penguin colonies to beaches crammed with elephant and fur seals, to breeding colonies of the bird with the largest wingspan in the world, the wandering albatross, to innumerable species of seabirds, South Georgia is a destination that serves up “days of a lifetime” every day!
Day 14, AM
Drake Passage
Day at Sea & Lectures
Days spent at sea are perfect for unwinding, relaxing, and doing as little or as much as you want to do. If fitness is your thing why not visit the ship’s gym? If you’re more into pampering, perhaps a spa treatment or two is all the energy you want to expend. Out on deck, you can look out for whales or dolphins and simply drink in the sights, sounds, and smells of the South Atlantic. Our advice is to take advantage of these relaxed days - you’ll soon be enjoying long and busy days of Antarctic exploration and adventure!
Day 15, AM
Solar Eclipse
Solar Eclipse
A real “bucket list” opportunity! On December 4th, 2021, a full solar eclipse occurs in the southern hemisphere. Totality will only be experienced in the Antarctic. The benefit of being on a cruise vessel? You can be positioned exactly in the center of the narrow path of the shadow cast by the moon as it blocks out the light from the sun. In December, the Antarctic experiences over 20 hours of daylight in every 24 hours, and even the “night” is more like deep dusk. Imagine the contrast, then, of being among the gleaming ice and rugged coastlines when everything is plunged into an eerie darkness. Your heart will skip a beat as the sun finally disappears, and the halo-like corona shows itself. Then, just as you have become used to the gloom, your breath will be taken away by the sudden brightness as the world returns to light and life. There are extremely limited numbers available thanks to the popularity of this experience with both antarctic explorers and eclipse hunters and astronomers. For most of us, this will combine a once-in-a-lifetime adventure trip with a once-in-a-lifetime astronomical experience. Book your Antarctic eclipse experience now!
Day 16, AM
Elephant Island
Elephant Island
Elephant Island is one of the outermost of the South Shetland Islands. The roots of its name are argued to be one of two reasons. Either the fact that Elephant seals were seen hauled out here in large numbers by the first person to discover and map the island, Captain George Powell in 1821, or that the island’s shape is uncannily like that of a baby elephant’s head with trunk extended! The island remained unexplored for many years thanks in part to its lack of resources (just small numbers of seals and penguins and no native plants) and partly because of its steep volcanic rocks, presenting few landing points. However, in 1916 Elephant Island became immortalized as the scene of the beyond-all-odds survival story that was Ernest Shackleton’s ill-fated Antarctic expedition. After their ship Endurance was lost to the treacherous ice in the Weddell Sea, the 28 crew were forced to make a perilous escape attempt. After months in open boats and stuck on drifting ice sheets, the team arrived at Elephant Island. Here they set up a base to stay while Shackleton and five members of his crew set sail in an open lifeboat for South Georgia - a journey of over 800 miles - to seek a rescue ship. This stunning tale of endurance, determination, and the human spirit is brought home to visitors to Elephant Island by the Endurance Memorial at Point Wild. You can also see breathtaking views of the Endurance Glacier - named after Shackleton’s lost ship - as well as the stunning rocky terrain and its gentoo penguins and seals.
Day 16, PM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
The weather in the Antarctic can be unpredictable and conditions can change quickly. Your highly experienced captain and bridge crew will skilfully navigate these ice-laden waters, bringing you ever closer to your first landing on the Antarctic continent.
Day 17, AM
Astrolabe Island
Astrolabe Island
Astrolabe Island in 3 miles long, and can be found about 14 miles off the Cape Ducorps in the Bransfield Strait on the Trinity Peninsula. It was discovered in 1837 and named after the French expedition ship that found it. There is a wonderful crescent beach on the northern shore which is where you will land. Depending on the time of year you might have to pick your landing spot carefully to avoid the Antarctic fur seals who breed here and can be aggressive if they have very young pups. The main attraction is the chinstrap penguin colony, several thousand strong. On your way in or out of this site, you will no doubt sail close to a group of impressive rocks that stick out of the sea to the northeast, known as the Dragon’s Teeth. Some of our expert Antarctic cruise guides have decided that if your ship sails in between any of the teeth, that means you have “flossed” Astrolabe Island!
Day 17, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff is a great example of a “tuya” - a volcano that has been flattened by erupting through a glacier! These are the rarest of all volcano types and only found in areas which have seen large scale glaciation in the past. Brown Bluff with its distinctive “tabletop” look, lies on the Tabarin Peninsula, in the northernmost part of the Antarctic Peninsula. The landing beach here is made of pebbles and volcanic ash, rising quickly towards steep reddish-brown cliffs. The cliffs are embedded with “volcanic bombs” - large pieces of lava that were thrown out during an eruption, cooling in the air to land as solid spherical or oval shapes. As well as the fascinating geology, the other star of the show is the birdlife. Brown Bluff is home to over 20,000 breeding pairs of Adelie penguins, as well as a small colony of gentoo penguins. Other breeding residents include storm petrels, Cape petrels, and kelp gulls. Weddell seals often haul out on the beach here, and it’s also common to see Leopard seals hunting in the waters close to the shore.
Day 17, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island is well-named! This narrow, rocky island has a low valley in the middle, with two peaks at either end. This gives it an uncanny “devil’s horns” look! It’s found in the James Ross Island group of the Antarctic Peninsula. Its location in a small cove makes it popular with Antarctic wildlife. Devil Island gives an opportunity for you to photograph some breathtaking views. From the landing site, you are greeted by some spectacular volcanic formations. From here, you can hike to the top of one of the peaks, which overlooks an Adelie penguin colony nestling below in a natural bowl formation. But the star of the show here is the remarkable 360-degree viewpoint you get from the top. From the high vantage point, you might spot fur seals, crabeater seals, and a variety of seabirds. It really makes the short, but steep climb worth it. Your expert Antarctic guides will show you the way and point out any wildlife you may have missed. Devil Island offers some stunning antarctic vistas that you don’t want to miss, so ensure your camera batteries are charged and spare memory cards are ready!
Day 18, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 18, AM
Cuverville Island
Cuverville Island
This small, steep-sided island is only 1.5 by 1.25 miles and two-thirds of it sits under a permanent ice-cap. On its northern shore is a pebble and boulder beach backed by steep cliffs where you will arrive by zodiac from your Antarctic cruise vessel and come ashore. At both ends of this beach are impressive Gentoo penguin colonies. You will be able to clearly see the trails they use to make their way too and from the water. There are other colonies and nesting sites on the higher ground behind the beach, and throughout the island. You can also see the evidence of the whaling activity that went on here in the early 1900s, including discarded whalebones and the remains of the equipment used to hall them ashore for processing. This small island is carefully protected - only one ship at a time may land passengers here and there are other restrictions to ensure the wildlife is not unnecessarily disturbed. Some areas of the island are closed to visitors, but the rest allows you to roam freely, and your expert guides will show you the resident flora and fauna, as well as explaining the island’s whaling history.
Day 18, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Damoy Point
Damoy Point
Damoy Point is a rocky headland on the west coast of Wiencke Island, near the northern entrance to the natural harbor at Port Lockroy. It was discovered and mapped by the French Antarctic expedition of 1903 led by Charcot. The point is rather unassuming and at first glance doesn’t warrant a visit. However, it has a couple of hidden gems - two very well preserved expedition huts. The first, known as Damoy Hut, was built in 1973 and was used by the British Antarctic Survey as a summer air facility and a personnel transfer station, but hasn’t been used since 1993. The interior is in excellent condition and almost looks as if it could be put back into use straight away. There are even tin cups hanging on the kitchen wall as if ready to give travel-weary scientists a restoring cup of tea! Just outside Damoy Hut is a refuge built by Argentina in the 1950s. This is not open to visitors and is still in use as an emergency refuge should the need ever arise. Apart from these historic buildings, visitors will see a small colony of Gentoo penguins who breed here, as well as plenty of seals and sea birds.
Day 18, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Portal Point
Portal Point
Portal Point is a narrow, rocky point on the northeast of the Reclus Peninsula off Graham Land. It was named by British explorers as it formed part of the “gateway” for the route to the Antarctic Plateau. In 1956, a refuge hut was established here, known as Cape Reclus Refuge. It was only used for two winters and then abandoned. In 1996, the hut was removed and is now in the Falklands Island Museum. All that’s left of the refuge on the Point are the remains of its foundations, often not visible under the frequent snow cover. Indeed, this year-round snow is why there are no penguin colonies here. However, Portal Point is a popular place for Weddell seals to haul out, and while you are landing you will often see them in good numbers.
Day 19, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour is a mile-wide cove on the west coast of Graham Land, just southwest of Cape Anna. It was first discovered by a Belgian Antarctic survey of the Danco coast in 1898 and was then in regular use by whaling vessels in the early 1900s. The site is popular for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a beautiful location that provides stunning Antarctic views. The exposed rocky shoreline contrasts with the permanent snow patches dotted on the higher ground above it. To the south, there is deep permanent snow and ice. Glaciers ring the harbor and steep peaks rise above. It’s glorious! The other reason to visit Orne Harbour is to see the nesting colony of chinstrap penguins that have made their homes here. There’s a steep but safe hike up from the beach to the colony that sits on higher ground above the beach. As well as the penguins, you will be rewarded with remarkable views of the bay, and the glacier that regularly calves into the waters here.
Day 19, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Islands
Orne Islands
The Orne Islands are a cluster of small, low-lying rocky islands at the entrance to the Errera Channel. The lie just of the northern coast of Ronge Island off Graham Land. The largest Orne island has moderate slopes leading to a rocky central ridge that has permanent snowbanks. There are also three other small islets that make up the group. Your landing will be via a low rock platform on the north-west side of the main island. Once ashore, you can roam freely around the island under the supervision of your expert guides. The Orne Islands are home to Skuas, which nest in the rocky outcrops here, as well as other Antarctic seabirds and penguins. In winter, impressive snow cliffs can form near the landing site. To avoid disturbing the wildlife, numbers on the island are restricted, and during nesting seasons your guides may limit the areas in which you can roam to protect nests.
Day 19, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Wordie House
Wordie House, Winter Island
Nestled onto the only flat part of Winter Island, Wordie House is a hut built in 1947. It was named by a British Antarctic expedition of the time after James Wordie, who was the chief scientist on Shackleton’s famous 1914 Antarctic exploration. Winter Island is less than 1,000 yards long and is one of the Argentine Islands off the coast of Graham Land. Before it closed in 1954, the hut was used to take meteorological readings using instruments stored inside special screens, one of which still stands today. These readings were among the most important and longest set of weather data ever recorded about the Antarctic and helped scientists gain a greater understanding of the meteorology of the continent. Wordie House was made a “Historic Site and Monument” in 1995 and has been looked after by the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust since 2009. There are almost 500 original artifacts still on the site, including original cans of coffee, records, pots and pans, plates, and many more £everyday” items. This makes Wordie House a true time capsule from the golden age of Antarctic exploration and scientific research. The hut is now fully weathertight, and work continues on preserving this unique station. Visits to Winter Island and Wordie House are managed by the nearby Ukrainian station Vernadsky, and you may well be briefed by the Base Commander or other official before you board your boats for the landing. Uniquely for such a historic site, visitors are allowed to roam freely under the supervision of their expert Antarctic guides. They will answer all your questions about the history of the hut, as well as the artifacts that you can find here. Visitors to Winter Island can also expect to see seabirds such as skuas and kelp gulls, as well as seals and penguins.
Day 19, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Yalour Islands
Yalour Islands
The Yalour Islands (also sometimes called Jalour Islands) are a 1.5-mile long group of small islands and protruding rocks off Cape Tuxen in Graham Land. The islands were discovered and named in 1903 by the French Antarctic expedition led by Charcot. Most of the Yalour Islands are steep-sided or unsuitable for landing due to sea conditions, but the largest island has some cobbled beaches where you can put ashore. Visitors come here to make the short climb up from the beach to the Adelie penguin breeding colonies. There are thought to be around 8,000 breeding pairs of Adelies in the Yalour Islands, and they have nested on every bit of rock they can find that’s not snow-covered. It makes for an amazing sight as you come in to land on the beach! Photographic opportunities here are excellent. The high mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula form a stunning backdrop to shots of the Adelie nest sites. Your expert guides will lead you around, showing you the best sites, and answering all your questions about the penguins and their lives.
Day 20, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
As you sail towards the South Shetland Islands your expert guides will entertain and educate you with a series of lectures and talks. From natural history to human history, geology to marine biology, there's something for everyone. All of the crew are experts in the field chosen not only for their huge depth of knowledge but also for their passion and enthusiasm. They really make this most remote of the world's regions come alive.
Day 20, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island one of the South Shetland Islands off the Antarctic Peninsula. The island is actually the top of the cone (the caldera) of an active shield volcano that last erupted in 1969. This flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbor, although Baily Head itself is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl in the landscape, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach at Baily Head you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream allows them to create a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving back and forth at any time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Head include Antarctic Fur Seals who regularly haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell, and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels, and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Head.
Day 20, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Telefon Bay
Telefon Bay on Deception Island
Deception Island is the eroded cone of an active volcano, that last erupted in 1967. It sits in the Bransfield Strait and is part of the South Shetland Islands. Telefon Bay is on the northwest coast of the volcano and is overlooked by Telefon Ridge. Despite the name, the bay has nothing to do with communications! It was first mapped in 1908 and was named after a Norwegian ship, the SS Telefon, that had been damaged and was put aground here for repairs later that year before being refloated. The backdrop to the beach is dramatic. In the rising land behind it, you will see a number of volcanic craters, some of which are up to 150ft deep - although gradually being filled in with ice and sediments. To the east and west are cliffs made of ash that were the result of activity in the 1967 eruption that impacted Telefon Bay. You will be allowed to roam freely here, provided you stick to the main paths and give any penguins a wide berth! You will often see scientific equipment placed around the bay that is used for monitoring any seismic disturbances - it will be clearly marked to help you avoid it. The shallow beach here is a favorite place for seals to haul out, and you can often encounter both Weddell and fur seals as you come in for a landing.
Day 21, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 22, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 23, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival at Ushuaia
Welcome to Ushuaia. It's official, you have arrived at the world's most southerly city with the evocative motto "End of the World, Beginning of Everything". Over 50,000 people call Ushuaia home. Its unusual name derives from the language of the Yaghan people, indigenous to the Tierra del Fuego region, and translates as "deep bay". The city was formally founded in 1884 after a small settlement and a prison had been built there in the years before, but by 1893 the population was still less than 150 thanks to a series of epidemics and the remote location. The prison population began to grow as it was used to house dangerous and repeat offenders. In effect, for the first 50 years of the city's existence, the prisoners became forced colonists, helping to build up the town and to secure the Argentine claims to the Tierra del Fuego region. Today, Ushuaia is a busy port and a hub for adventure travel to the Antarctic and South Atlantic. Lying below the lovely snow-capped Martial Mountains, the city has grown in a rather jumbled way, expanding from its sole main street and waterfront thanks to an increase in tourism and travel. If you want to relax before your Antarctic adventure, then a stroll along the waterfront - pausing for a selfie in front of the "end of the world" sign, of course! - is a pleasant way to spend your time. If you're feeling more energetic there are many options for hiking, biking, and boat rides into Beagle Channel. You can even take spectacular helicopter tours! In town, there are plenty of restaurants, shops, and a recent boom in craft beers means there are several places now vying for the title of the world's most southerly brewery!
Day 23, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark in Ushuaia
After a remarkable adventure, it's time to leave your expedition ship and bid a fond farewell to your amazing crew and to the new friends you will have made.

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Your ship: Silver Wind

Welcome aboard the Silver Wind, an elegant and versatile ship perfectly suited for your Arctic and Antarctic cruise. The Silver Wind underwent a major upgrade in 2018 and a second one in 2020, where it benefited from a new and improved ice-class hull. This strongly reinforced hull will make the Silver Wind one of the most adaptable cruise ships in the Silversea fleet. The service aboard the Silver Wind cruises are exquisite, with a total of 239 crew members ready and eager to serve a maximum of 274 passengers. Her timeless features and luxuriously relaxed atmosphere will make your Arctic or Antarctic cruise experience one to remember. The variety of suite options available on the Silver Wind suit all types of comfort levels. Each suite includes a fully equipped mini bar, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet, a bathrobe and slippers, Italian linens and for your personal preference, a selection of pillows and toiletries to choose from. Many of these beautiful suites come with balconies and range from 240 sq feet (ca. 22 m²) to the largest Owner’s Suite at 587sq feet (ca. 55 m²). The atmosphere aboard the Silver Wind Arctic or Antarctic cruises is international. English is the main language spoken, however, you will most likely meet passengers from all over the world. The mood is sophisticated and tranquil, appropriate for any guest to enjoy. The daytime dress code is casual, as the polar regions require suitable clothing. And within a 7-day cruise, you will be able to participate in one formal night. It is recommended ladies wear a cocktail or evening dress, while gentlemen wear a dark suit or tuxedo. Despite its intimate size, the Silver Wind offers a variety of amenities and entertainment options. Make your Polar cruise a perfect one with a full range of spa treatments at the Zagara Beauty Spa. Relax in the outdoor heated swimming pool, or try your luck at the Casino. The Silver Wind cruises also offer free fitness classes including Yoga, and Pilates as well as a small gym. Passengers of all ages can enjoy the Sports center equipped with a jogging track, a golf cage, paddle tennis, and a putting green. For those looking for a more educational experience during their Arctic or Antarctic cruise on board the Silver Wind, visit the beautiful Parisian Show Lounge for daily lectures as well as Trivia games, language lessons, live music, and more. The Library also offers audio-listening stations and on-demand movies. Make sure you head to the Observation Lounge for a 270-degree panoramic view of the incredible Polar horizons. Lastly, adults can enjoy the smoking lounge at the Connoisseur’s Corner, furnished with leather armchairs where one can purchase vintage wines, cognacs, and fine cigars.

Amenities

Cocktail Symbol
Bar
Casino Icon
Casino
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
Spa Icon
Spa
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Connoisseur's Corner Icon
Connoisseur's Corner
photo studio icon
Photo Studio
Observation Lounge Icon
Observation Lounge
Library Icon
Library
Conference room icon
Conference Room

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
The Silver Wind goes at lengths in order to...

Food & Drinks

The dining options aboard the Silver Wind cruises are nothing short of delicious. Your Arctic or Antarctic cruise will not be complete without tasting all the different flavors the ship has to offer. The Restaurant, an open-seating dining room, offers gourmet Mediterranean meals. Make a dinner reservation at Le Champagne, and enjoy signature French cuisine in an intimate setting. La Terraza is a complimentary buffet-style restaurant offering both indoor and outdoor seating. La Terraza transforms into a reservation-only Italian fare at dinnertime. The Pool Bar & Pool Grill serve fast food and drinks in the pool deck area. In the evening, the area is converted into an al fresco dining experience with classic seafood and steakhouse choices. The Grill offers gourmet dining under the stars. Its signature dishes include lava-rocks grilled meat, seafood, Mediterranean vegetables, and more. The “Black Rock Grill Experience” is a fun hands-on dining concept allowing guests to cook their own meat and seafood. Last but not least, the Bar offers passengers ample comfortable seating and complimentary cocktails. Enjoy live music performances, and for those brave enough, a dance floor. The best part? The all-inclusive Silversea package also includes gratuities. Tipping is included!

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