An Antarctica Cruise with Polartours on board the G Expedition

Ushuaia to Ushuaia

Reach out and touch the last uninhabited region at the end of the Earth on this 19-day Antarctic cruise

Ushuaia to Ushuaia

On board the Silver Wind
19-day cruise
Antarctic Cruise
100 Reviews
5/5
Pool Icon
Pool
oin us for a journey to the last untouched continent including a visit to several of the Falkland Islands. Enjoy the beautiful Falkland Islands where Black-browed Albatross colonies are found next to Rockhopper Penguins and Imperial Shag colonies. Its recent history and the British flair make the Falkland Islands special. Antarctica offers spectacular icebergs and calving glaciers, as well as the possibility of up-close encounters with penguins ashore, seals sunbathing on slow-moving ice floes, and humpback or minke whales surfacing close to the ship. Adventure in Antarctica where weather depending, we will take daily Zodiac departures and cruise amidst colorful icebergs, or step ashore to visit a variety of penguin rookeries on excursions led by our team of natural history experts. Go kayaking in Antarctica under the guidance of certified instructors, and cross the incredible Drake Passage to look for pelagic birds, including petrels and prions. Throughout the voyage, learn about the geology, wildlife and history of this spectacular area from lecture presentations offered by your knowledgeable onboard Expedition Team.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival at Ushuaia
Welcome to Ushuaia. It's official, you have arrived at the world's most southerly city with the evocative motto "End of the World, Beginning of Everything". Over 50,000 people call Ushuaia home. Its unusual name derives from the language of the Yaghan people, indigenous to the Tierra del Fuego region, and translates as "deep bay". The city was formally founded in 1884 after a small settlement and a prison had been built there in the years before, but by 1893 the population was still less than 150 thanks to a series of epidemics and the remote location. The prison population began to grow as it was used to house dangerous and repeat offenders. In effect, for the first 50 years of the city's existence, the prisoners became forced colonists, helping to build up the town and to secure the Argentine claims to the Tierra del Fuego region. Today, Ushuaia is a busy port and a hub for adventure travel to the Antarctic and South Atlantic. Lying below the lovely snow-capped Martial Mountains, the city has grown in a rather jumbled way, expanding from its sole main street and waterfront thanks to an increase in tourism and travel. If you want to relax before your Antarctic adventure, then a stroll along the waterfront - pausing for a selfie in front of the "end of the world" sign, of course! - is a pleasant way to spend your time. If you're feeling more energetic there are many options for hiking, biking, and boat rides into Beagle Channel. You can even take spectacular helicopter tours! In town, there are plenty of restaurants, shops, and a recent boom in craft beers means there are several places now vying for the title of the world's most southerly brewery!
Day 1, PM
Embarking ship
Embark
Boarding usually begins in the afternoon. Everyone will have a safety briefing and demonstration, and then you are free to explore your new floating home and meet your fellow Antarctic explorers! Later, you'll get an expedition overview from your fantastic expedition guides. You'll spend the night on board as your ship begins its journey south.
Day 2, AM
Sail Falkland Islands
Sail to the Falkland Islands & Lectures
As you get to know your ship - finding those cozy corners to read, or the best spots on deck for whale watching - you'll also have the opportunity to learn from the onboard experts. Every ship carries a range of guides with specialties in wildlife, marine biology, geology, history, and more. They provide a program of informative and entertaining lectures and talks that help you to deepen your understanding of and appreciation for this remote yet wonderful region at the end of the Earth.
Day 3, AM
Westpoint Island
West Point Island
Well-named West Point Island is one of the furthest points in the northwest of the Falklands archipelago. Known originally as Albatross Island (and Isla Remolinos in Spanish), this 5.5 square miles of grassy rock has some of the most stunning scenery to be found in the islands. West Point is a working sheep farm and is owned by the Napier family, who will warmly welcome you to their home. As its original name implies, you’ll also be welcomed by the calls and shrieks from the huge colony of black-browed albatross that live here. In fact, more than two-thirds of the world’s entire albatross population breed here in the Falklands! But the highest cliffs and the biggest albatross colony aren’t the only things that await you on West Point. There is a large southern rockhopper penguin colony, as well as a smaller Magellanic penguin nest site. Other notable bird species include striated caracaras, Cobb's wrens, blackish cinclodes, and white-bridled finches. In fact, there are so many important species here that West Point Island has been formally listed as an Important Bird Area (IBA). The other thing you’ll get on West Point is fantastic Napier hospitality! Your group will be welcomed with traditional tea, cake, and biscuits as well as an invitation to walk around the island gardens.
Day 3, PM
Saunders Island
Saunders Island
Saunders Island (known in Spanish as Isla Trinidad) is in the northwest of the Falkland Islands group and is the 4th largest individual island with 50 square miles of land. Saunders Island is geographically stunning, as well as rich with remarkable wildlife. The island is made up of three peninsulas that are joined by narrow necks of land. The three uplands towner over the necks, with the tallest, Mount Richards, being 1,500ft above the waves below. The views from the headlands are astonishing. Saunders Island has been designated an Important Bird Area (or IBA) thanks to the large numbers of breeding species that make their homes here. The beaches are home to thousands of gentoo, rockhopper, macaroni, and king penguins - you can’t avoid hearing their raucous cries from all over the island! There is also a colony of Magellanic penguins on Saunders Islands - these are some of the most southerly of that species in the world. Other significant species to be found on Saunders include Falkland steamer ducks, black-browed albatrosses, and white-bridled finch. In the waters off the shoreline, you can see the delightful Commerson’s dolphins - their black and white markings making them seem like miniature orcas. Visiting Elephant Point will bring you face-to-face with the small colony of elephant seals that live here and gave their name to the beach. You can also often find southern right whales in the sheltered bays here feeding and resting before moving on.
Day 4, AM
Stanley
Stanley
Stanley (sometimes called Stanley) is the capital of the Falkland Islands and is quintessentially British - albeit reminiscent of a Britain from yesteryear. But there’s something remarkable about seeing the red “telephone boxes” and signs for “fish n chips” sitting in a landscape that’s more like Patagonia than the pastoral English countryside. Stanley is home to 70% of the Falklands’ population, about 2,500 people. There’s a gentle pace to life here, but if there’s a cruise ship or two in the harbor then it can feel quite lively! As well as pubs and “chippies” there are some definite signs that you’re not in Europe. Visit Christ Church Cathedral, opened in 1892, and you’ll enter through an arch built from the jaws of two huge blue whales. A stroll to Victory Green in central Stanley will bring you face to face with a mizzen mast from the original SS Great Britain. Brunel built the world’s first propeller-driven iron ship in 1843, and it was badly damaged by gales when rounding Cape Horn in 1886, limping back to the Falkland Islands where it lay abandoned for almost a century. Walk down Pioneer Row and you’ll see the original settlers’ cottages, not only still standing but in perfect condition. Originally shipped the 8,000 miles from the UK as kits, they were erected quickly by the first settlers to provide warmth and shelter from the sometimes forbidding weather. But no matter what other unique and unusual sites you see in this southern hemisphere town, the Union Jack flags flying and the garden gnomes in gardens won’t let you forget that this is a piece of Britain at the edge of the Antarctic.
Day 4, PM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
On the journey to South Georgia, your naturalist guides will entertain and educate you with a range of lectures about South Georgia, its wildlife, geology, and history. You'll also have plenty of time to be on deck - wrapped up warm, of course - watching as Antarctic bird species flying overhead, as well as spotting whales and other marine mammals as you approach the coast.
Day 5, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
On the journey to South Georgia, your naturalist guides will entertain and educate you with a range of lectures about South Georgia, its wildlife, geology, and history. You'll also have plenty of time to be on deck - wrapped up warm, of course - watching as Antarctic bird species flying overhead, as well as spotting whales and other marine mammals as you approach the coast.
Day 6, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
On the journey to South Georgia, your naturalist guides will entertain and educate you with a range of lectures about South Georgia, its wildlife, geology, and history. You'll also have plenty of time to be on deck - wrapped up warm, of course - watching as Antarctic bird species flying overhead, as well as spotting whales and other marine mammals as you approach the coast.
Day 7, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island (known as Isla San Pedro in Spanish) is often described, quite rightly, as a highlight of many peoples’ Antarctic cruise experience. The remote, rocky main island is 850 miles from the Falkland Islands and the same distance from the Antarctic Peninsula. It’s quite mountainous, with a central high ridge and plenty of bays and fjords on its coast, making for some stunning views and remarkable photographs. There are 8 smaller islands (the South Sandwich Islands) located 400 miles to the southeast which are rarely visited. South Georgia has a human history mainly centered around the sealing and whaling industries, with relics such as try pots and sunken whaling ships to be discovered. Many people also pay a visit to the grave of Ernest Shackleton, one of the most famous Antarctic explorers, who died unexpectedly of a heart attack while in South Georgia. Part of one of the world’s largest marine reserves, the variety of the wildlife to be found in South Georgia is what attracts most of its visitors. From the world’s largest king penguin colonies to beaches crammed with elephant and fur seals, to breeding colonies of the bird with the largest wingspan in the world, the wandering albatross, to innumerable species of seabirds, South Georgia is a destination that serves up “days of a lifetime” every day!
Day 8, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island (known as Isla San Pedro in Spanish) is often described, quite rightly, as a highlight of many peoples’ Antarctic cruise experience. The remote, rocky main island is 850 miles from the Falkland Islands and the same distance from the Antarctic Peninsula. It’s quite mountainous, with a central high ridge and plenty of bays and fjords on its coast, making for some stunning views and remarkable photographs. There are 8 smaller islands (the South Sandwich Islands) located 400 miles to the southeast which are rarely visited. South Georgia has a human history mainly centered around the sealing and whaling industries, with relics such as try pots and sunken whaling ships to be discovered. Many people also pay a visit to the grave of Ernest Shackleton, one of the most famous Antarctic explorers, who died unexpectedly of a heart attack while in South Georgia. Part of one of the world’s largest marine reserves, the variety of the wildlife to be found in South Georgia is what attracts most of its visitors. From the world’s largest king penguin colonies to beaches crammed with elephant and fur seals, to breeding colonies of the bird with the largest wingspan in the world, the wandering albatross, to innumerable species of seabirds, South Georgia is a destination that serves up “days of a lifetime” every day!
Day 9, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island (known as Isla San Pedro in Spanish) is often described, quite rightly, as a highlight of many peoples’ Antarctic cruise experience. The remote, rocky main island is 850 miles from the Falkland Islands and the same distance from the Antarctic Peninsula. It’s quite mountainous, with a central high ridge and plenty of bays and fjords on its coast, making for some stunning views and remarkable photographs. There are 8 smaller islands (the South Sandwich Islands) located 400 miles to the southeast which are rarely visited. South Georgia has a human history mainly centered around the sealing and whaling industries, with relics such as try pots and sunken whaling ships to be discovered. Many people also pay a visit to the grave of Ernest Shackleton, one of the most famous Antarctic explorers, who died unexpectedly of a heart attack while in South Georgia. Part of one of the world’s largest marine reserves, the variety of the wildlife to be found in South Georgia is what attracts most of its visitors. From the world’s largest king penguin colonies to beaches crammed with elephant and fur seals, to breeding colonies of the bird with the largest wingspan in the world, the wandering albatross, to innumerable species of seabirds, South Georgia is a destination that serves up “days of a lifetime” every day!
Day 9, PM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
As you sail towards the South Shetland Islands your expert guides will entertain and educate you with a series of lectures and talks. From natural history to human history, geology to marine biology, there's something for everyone. All of the crew are experts in the field chosen not only for their huge depth of knowledge but also for their passion and enthusiasm. They really make this most remote of the world's regions come alive.
Day 10, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
As you sail towards the South Shetland Islands your expert guides will entertain and educate you with a series of lectures and talks. From natural history to human history, geology to marine biology, there's something for everyone. All of the crew are experts in the field chosen not only for their huge depth of knowledge but also for their passion and enthusiasm. They really make this most remote of the world's regions come alive.
Day 11, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
As you sail towards the South Shetland Islands your expert guides will entertain and educate you with a series of lectures and talks. From natural history to human history, geology to marine biology, there's something for everyone. All of the crew are experts in the field chosen not only for their huge depth of knowledge but also for their passion and enthusiasm. They really make this most remote of the world's regions come alive.
Day 12, AM
Elephant Island
Elephant Island
Elephant Island is one of the outermost of the South Shetland Islands. The roots of its name are argued to be one of two reasons. Either the fact that Elephant seals were seen hauled out here in large numbers by the first person to discover and map the island, Captain George Powell in 1821, or that the island’s shape is uncannily like that of a baby elephant’s head with trunk extended! The island remained unexplored for many years thanks in part to its lack of resources (just small numbers of seals and penguins and no native plants) and partly because of its steep volcanic rocks, presenting few landing points. However, in 1916 Elephant Island became immortalized as the scene of the beyond-all-odds survival story that was Ernest Shackleton’s ill-fated Antarctic expedition. After their ship Endurance was lost to the treacherous ice in the Weddell Sea, the 28 crew were forced to make a perilous escape attempt. After months in open boats and stuck on drifting ice sheets, the team arrived at Elephant Island. Here they set up a base to stay while Shackleton and five members of his crew set sail in an open lifeboat for South Georgia - a journey of over 800 miles - to seek a rescue ship. This stunning tale of endurance, determination, and the human spirit is brought home to visitors to Elephant Island by the Endurance Memorial at Point Wild. You can also see breathtaking views of the Endurance Glacier - named after Shackleton’s lost ship - as well as the stunning rocky terrain and its gentoo penguins and seals.
Day 13, AM
Antarctic Sound
Antarctic Sound
A gateway to the ultimate adventure that only a few will be lucky enough to experience. The 30-mile long Antarctic Sound will be your first encounter with the rugged beauty of this continent Located at the northerly tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, the Sound is a remarkable onslaught for the senses as you come face-to-face with monstrous slabs of ice, now floating free as enormous icebergs, that broke away from the Larsen Ice shelf. Treacherous to early explorers, the first vessel to successfully navigate the Sound was The Antarctic, the vessel of a Swedish Expedition of 1903. Unfortunately, she was trapped here by ice the following year and crushed - one of several vessels to have that fate over the decade. Fortunately, modern polar cruising vessels have no such worries with their strengthened hulls and modern navigation technology. As you enter the monochromatic beauty of white ice and grey sea you will know that that you are soon going to experience some of the remarkable sights and encounter the wonderful wildlife that makes its home in these islands of snow, ice, and rock.
Day 13, PM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
The weather in the Antarctic can be unpredictable and conditions can change quickly. Your highly experienced captain and bridge crew will skilfully navigate these ice-laden waters, bringing you ever closer to your first landing on the Antarctic continent.
Day 14, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 14, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Damoy Point
Damoy Point
Damoy Point is a rocky headland on the west coast of Wiencke Island, near the northern entrance to the natural harbor at Port Lockroy. It was discovered and mapped by the French Antarctic expedition of 1903 led by Charcot. The point is rather unassuming and at first glance doesn’t warrant a visit. However, it has a couple of hidden gems - two very well preserved expedition huts. The first, known as Damoy Hut, was built in 1973 and was used by the British Antarctic Survey as a summer air facility and a personnel transfer station, but hasn’t been used since 1993. The interior is in excellent condition and almost looks as if it could be put back into use straight away. There are even tin cups hanging on the kitchen wall as if ready to give travel-weary scientists a restoring cup of tea! Just outside Damoy Hut is a refuge built by Argentina in the 1950s. This is not open to visitors and is still in use as an emergency refuge should the need ever arise. Apart from these historic buildings, visitors will see a small colony of Gentoo penguins who breed here, as well as plenty of seals and sea birds.
Day 14, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff is a great example of a “tuya” - a volcano that has been flattened by erupting through a glacier! These are the rarest of all volcano types and only found in areas which have seen large scale glaciation in the past. Brown Bluff with its distinctive “tabletop” look, lies on the Tabarin Peninsula, in the northernmost part of the Antarctic Peninsula. The landing beach here is made of pebbles and volcanic ash, rising quickly towards steep reddish-brown cliffs. The cliffs are embedded with “volcanic bombs” - large pieces of lava that were thrown out during an eruption, cooling in the air to land as solid spherical or oval shapes. As well as the fascinating geology, the other star of the show is the birdlife. Brown Bluff is home to over 20,000 breeding pairs of Adelie penguins, as well as a small colony of gentoo penguins. Other breeding residents include storm petrels, Cape petrels, and kelp gulls. Weddell seals often haul out on the beach here, and it’s also common to see Leopard seals hunting in the waters close to the shore.
Day 14, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island is well-named! This narrow, rocky island has a low valley in the middle, with two peaks at either end. This gives it an uncanny “devil’s horns” look! It’s found in the James Ross Island group of the Antarctic Peninsula. Its location in a small cove makes it popular with Antarctic wildlife. Devil Island gives an opportunity for you to photograph some breathtaking views. From the landing site, you are greeted by some spectacular volcanic formations. From here, you can hike to the top of one of the peaks, which overlooks an Adelie penguin colony nestling below in a natural bowl formation. But the star of the show here is the remarkable 360-degree viewpoint you get from the top. From the high vantage point, you might spot fur seals, crabeater seals, and a variety of seabirds. It really makes the short, but steep climb worth it. Your expert Antarctic guides will show you the way and point out any wildlife you may have missed. Devil Island offers some stunning antarctic vistas that you don’t want to miss, so ensure your camera batteries are charged and spare memory cards are ready!
Day 15, AM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Detaille
Detaille Island
Detaille Island is a small island in the Lallemand Fjord, part of the Arrowsmith Peninsula in Graham Land. It’s not much more than a rocky outcrop with gravel beaches, but it contains one of the best-preserved historic monuments in the Antarctic. Detaille was home to “Base W” of the British Antarctic Survey. It was constructed in 1956 and was in use until 1959 when it was closed. Due to bad weather, the supply ship that was sent to take the men and equipment off the island couldn’t get any closer than 30 miles away. This meant that the men had to leave very quickly and with only the personal belongings that they could carry so the ship could depart as quickly as possible. Because of these circumstances, Base W is almost completely intact. As you look around the hut you will be greeted with the eerie sight of tables still set out with condiments, shelves neatly stacked with tin and jars, and everyday equipment like washing machines, tools, and even coats, longjohns, and bottles of gin and whisky (empty!). Preserved by the United Kingdom Antarctic Heritage Trust, this is a remarkable insight into the early post-war scientific explorations of this amazing continent, and it makes Detaille Island and Base W a “must-visit” on any Antarctic itinerary.
Day 15, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Horseshoe Island
Horseshoe Island
Horseshoe Island is well named. The 3000ft high peaks here are arranged in a crescent shape and were first mapped by air by intrepid British explorers in the 1930s. The island sits in Square Bay, off the coast of Graham Land. You will land at the northwestern tip of Horshoe Island in Sally Cove. From here, it’s a short walk north to the amazingly preserved hut known as “Base Y” or Horseshoe Station. This was established in 1955 as a scientific base and was closed permanently in 1960. Although unused for over 60 years, Base Y is in a remarkable state of preservation and represents a model example of a fully-equipped exploration and scientific base of the time. Inside the hut, you will be able to carefully explore by torchlight as you see artifacts from a bygone age. These include the original base generator, tools, light fixtures, tins and packets of original rations, and more items from the daily lives of the scientists who made Horshoe Island their temporary homes. Although this time-capsule building is the star of the show, it’s not unusual to encounter seals and skuas on or near to the landing site here.
Day 15, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Stonington Island
Stonington Island
For such a tiny, rock island (it’s less than half a mile by a quarter of a mile), Stonington holds a lot of the human history of Antarctica. It’s found in Marguerite Bay off the west of Graham Land. It was home to not one, but two winter expeditions. In 1939, the US Antarctic Service chose it as the location to build what became known as East Base. The buildings and artifacts here are now protected as a monument. Visitors can enter the main hut to experience something of what it would have been like to spend the dark and frozen winters on Stonington. Later in the 1940s, the British chose the same small island for the location of their “Base E”. Again, visitors can enter the main hut and also the generator shed. Like the American base, there are other ancillary buildings that can’t be entered due to their status as protected monuments. There are permanent shutters on the windows of Base E, so your guide should provide you with torches if you venture inside. In a solemn reminder of the harshness of the continent, there is also a gravesite where two expedition members are buried in coffins covered by simple stone cairns. An important breeding site for birds, Stonington Island supports a colony of over 130 pairs of imperial shags, as well as nesting sites for skuas and terns.
Day 16, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
As you sail towards the South Shetland Islands your expert guides will entertain and educate you with a series of lectures and talks. From natural history to human history, geology to marine biology, there's something for everyone. All of the crew are experts in the field chosen not only for their huge depth of knowledge but also for their passion and enthusiasm. They really make this most remote of the world's regions come alive.
Day 16, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Barrientos Island
Barrientos Island (Aitcho Islands)
Barrientos Island is one of the Aitcho group of islands, a sub-set of the South Shetlands chain. It’s an ice-free island that was used as far back as the early 19th century by sealers and whalers, despite only a mile long, and less than a third of a mile wide. It was given its name in 1949 by a Chilean Antarctic expedition. The northern coast of Barrientos is formed by steep cliffs about 230ft above the sea level. The east and west coasts are made up of black sand and pebble beaches. To the west, you can see impressive columns of basalt rock left over from the tectonic forces involved in the island’s formation. Barrientos is very popular with penguins - and because it is so small sometimes it can feel pretty crowded! Gentoo and chinstrap penguins breed here, and in peak season one colony can end up right next door to the other, making for a seamless vista of penguin nests! Other species that are commonly seen include fur seals, as well as nesting colonies of southern giant petrels. Your expert Antarctic guides will ensure you get close enough for some amazing photos while staying far enough away that you don’t disturb the breeding creatures.
Day 17, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 18, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 19, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival at Ushuaia
Welcome to Ushuaia. It's official, you have arrived at the world's most southerly city with the evocative motto "End of the World, Beginning of Everything". Over 50,000 people call Ushuaia home. Its unusual name derives from the language of the Yaghan people, indigenous to the Tierra del Fuego region, and translates as "deep bay". The city was formally founded in 1884 after a small settlement and a prison had been built there in the years before, but by 1893 the population was still less than 150 thanks to a series of epidemics and the remote location. The prison population began to grow as it was used to house dangerous and repeat offenders. In effect, for the first 50 years of the city's existence, the prisoners became forced colonists, helping to build up the town and to secure the Argentine claims to the Tierra del Fuego region. Today, Ushuaia is a busy port and a hub for adventure travel to the Antarctic and South Atlantic. Lying below the lovely snow-capped Martial Mountains, the city has grown in a rather jumbled way, expanding from its sole main street and waterfront thanks to an increase in tourism and travel. If you want to relax before your Antarctic adventure, then a stroll along the waterfront - pausing for a selfie in front of the "end of the world" sign, of course! - is a pleasant way to spend your time. If you're feeling more energetic there are many options for hiking, biking, and boat rides into Beagle Channel. You can even take spectacular helicopter tours! In town, there are plenty of restaurants, shops, and a recent boom in craft beers means there are several places now vying for the title of the world's most southerly brewery!
Day 19, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark in Ushuaia
After a remarkable adventure, it's time to leave your expedition ship and bid a fond farewell to your amazing crew and to the new friends you will have made.

Dates & Prices

Select date and passengers
Number of passengers
2

Your ship: Silver Wind

Welcome aboard the Silver Wind, an elegant and versatile ship perfectly suited for your Arctic and Antarctic cruise. The Silver Wind underwent a major upgrade in 2018 and a second one in 2020, where it benefited from a new and improved ice-class hull. This strongly reinforced hull will make the Silver Wind one of the most adaptable cruise ships in the Silversea fleet. The service aboard the Silver Wind cruises are exquisite, with a total of 239 crew members ready and eager to serve a maximum of 274 passengers. Her timeless features and luxuriously relaxed atmosphere will make your Arctic or Antarctic cruise experience one to remember. The variety of suite options available on the Silver Wind suit all types of comfort levels. Each suite includes a fully equipped mini bar, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet, a bathrobe and slippers, Italian linens and for your personal preference, a selection of pillows and toiletries to choose from. Many of these beautiful suites come with balconies and range from 240 sq feet (ca. 22 m²) to the largest Owner’s Suite at 587sq feet (ca. 55 m²). The atmosphere aboard the Silver Wind Arctic or Antarctic cruises is international. English is the main language spoken, however, you will most likely meet passengers from all over the world. The mood is sophisticated and tranquil, appropriate for any guest to enjoy. The daytime dress code is casual, as the polar regions require suitable clothing. And within a 7-day cruise, you will be able to participate in one formal night. It is recommended ladies wear a cocktail or evening dress, while gentlemen wear a dark suit or tuxedo. Despite its intimate size, the Silver Wind offers a variety of amenities and entertainment options. Make your Polar cruise a perfect one with a full range of spa treatments at the Zagara Beauty Spa. Relax in the outdoor heated swimming pool, or try your luck at the Casino. The Silver Wind cruises also offer free fitness classes including Yoga, and Pilates as well as a small gym. Passengers of all ages can enjoy the Sports center equipped with a jogging track, a golf cage, paddle tennis, and a putting green. For those looking for a more educational experience during their Arctic or Antarctic cruise on board the Silver Wind, visit the beautiful Parisian Show Lounge for daily lectures as well as Trivia games, language lessons, live music, and more. The Library also offers audio-listening stations and on-demand movies. Make sure you head to the Observation Lounge for a 270-degree panoramic view of the incredible Polar horizons. Lastly, adults can enjoy the smoking lounge at the Connoisseur’s Corner, furnished with leather armchairs where one can purchase vintage wines, cognacs, and fine cigars.

Amenities

Cocktail Symbol
Bar
Casino Icon
Casino
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
Spa Icon
Spa
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Connoisseur's Corner Icon
Connoisseur's Corner
photo studio icon
Photo Studio
Observation Lounge Icon
Observation Lounge
Library Icon
Library
Conference room icon
Conference Room

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
The Silver Wind goes at lengths in order to...

Food & Drinks

The dining options aboard the Silver Wind cruises are nothing short of delicious. Your Arctic or Antarctic cruise will not be complete without tasting all the different flavors the ship has to offer. The Restaurant, an open-seating dining room, offers gourmet Mediterranean meals. Make a dinner reservation at Le Champagne, and enjoy signature French cuisine in an intimate setting. La Terraza is a complimentary buffet-style restaurant offering both indoor and outdoor seating. La Terraza transforms into a reservation-only Italian fare at dinnertime. The Pool Bar & Pool Grill serve fast food and drinks in the pool deck area. In the evening, the area is converted into an al fresco dining experience with classic seafood and steakhouse choices. The Grill offers gourmet dining under the stars. Its signature dishes include lava-rocks grilled meat, seafood, Mediterranean vegetables, and more. The “Black Rock Grill Experience” is a fun hands-on dining concept allowing guests to cook their own meat and seafood. Last but not least, the Bar offers passengers ample comfortable seating and complimentary cocktails. Enjoy live music performances, and for those brave enough, a dance floor. The best part? The all-inclusive Silversea package also includes gratuities. Tipping is included!

Similar Experiences