Antarctic Peninsula

Ushuaia to Ushuaia

Sail further south than most on this epic journey to the Antarctic

Ushuaia to Ushuaia

On board the Silver Wind
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Your bucket list just got bigger. Enter the ranks of the elite traveler and sail south of the polar circle. Set your compass to latitude of 66° 33’ south, grab your parkas and get set for a frozen landscape that will impress even the most jaded traveler. This is a voyage of massive intentions: massive icebergs will be seen, massive colonies of penguin will be heard, massive expanses of water will be crossed meaning massive bragging rights will be assured.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 1, PM
Embarking ship
Embark
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 2, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, PM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
South Georgia
South Shetland Islands
The South Shetland Islands are located just north of the Antarctic Peninsula. Weather and ice conditions permitting, our goal is to attempt memorable shore landings daily and encounter gentoo, chinstrap, and Adélie penguin rookeries; Weddell, crabeater, and leopard seals; and orca, humpback, and minke whales in the cold Antarctic waters. The ship will attempt to reach the Antarctic Peninsula for a landing, weather and ice-permitting. The peninsula also has a remarkable human history; during the voyage we will learn about some of the most important and dramatic expeditions to this remote corner of the world.
Day 4, PM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 5, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island is made up of the cone of an active shield volcano. It last erupted in 1969. Its flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbour, although Baily Point is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream forms a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving at a time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Point include Antarctic Fur Seals who regular haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Point.
Day 5, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Telefon Bay
Telefon Bay on Deception Island
Topography: At the easternmost end of Telefon Bay, a gently sloping beach leads to a broad shallow valley which rises sharply to a number of unnamed volcanic craters. These are up to 45m in depth, although they are slowly being filled in by sediment and ice. The prominent ash cliffs that form the east and west sides of the valley are remnants of an older crater that was modified during an eruption in 1967, which broadened the valley itself. Potential Impact: Erosion of paths on crater ridge. Disturbance of scientific equipment. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Landing Area: Beach immediately to the south-west of the crater. Guided Walking Area: Visitors will be guided up to the crater in small closely supervised groups, with one guide per group of 1-15. Visitors should be closely supervised at the crater edge. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision in the landing beach area. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Stick to established paths where possible and move in single file on steep slopes.Walk slowly and carefully close at the crater edge.Do not tread on vegetated areas which are susceptible to trampling.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. • Exercise extreme caution when approaching the steep edge of the crater lip. The soil is friable and may collapse underfoot. • If seals are hauled out on the beach, slow down before landing."
Day 5, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Detaille
Detaille Island
Detaille Island is a small island in the Lallemand Fjord. It’s not much more than a rocky outcrop with gravel beaches, but it contains one of the best preserved historic monuments in the Antarctic. Detaille was home to “Base W” of the British Antarctic Survey. It was constructed in 1956, and was in use until 1959 when it was closed. Due to bad weather, the supply ship that was sent to take the men and equipment off the island couldn’t get any closer than 30 miles away. This meant that the men had to leave very quikly and with only the personal belongings that they could carry so the ship could depart as quickly as possible. Because of these circumstance, Base W is almost completely intact. As you look around the hut you will be greeted with the eerie sight of tables still set out with condiments, shelves neatly stacked with tin and jars, and everyday equipment like washing machines, tools, and even coats, longjohns and bottles of gin and whisky (empy!). Preserved by the United Kingdom Antarctic Heritage Trust, this is a remarkable insight into the early post-war scientific explorations of the amazing continent.
Day 6, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Horseshoe Island
Horseshoe Island
Horseshoe Island is well named. The 3000ft high peaks here are arranged in a crescent shape, and were first mapped by air by intrepid British explorers in the 1930s. You will land at the northwestern tip of the island in Sally Cove. From here, it’s a short walk north the the amazingly preserved hut known as “Base Y” or Horseshoe Station. This was established in the 1955 as a scientific base, and was closed permanently in 1960. Although unused for over 60 years, Base Y is in a remarkable state of preservation and represents a fully-equipped exploration and scientific base of the time. Inside the hut you will be able to carefully explore by torchlight as you see artefacts from a bygone age. These include the original base generator, tools, light fixtures, tins and packets of original rations and more. Although this time-capsule building is the star of the show, it’s not unusual to encounter seals and skuas on or near to the landing site here.
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Stonington Island
Stonington Island
For such a tiny, rock island (it’s less than half a mile by quarter of a mile), Stonington holds a lot of the human history of Antarctica. It was home to not one, but two winter expeditions. In 1939, the US Antarctic Service chose it as the location to build what became known as East Base. The buildings and artefacts here are now protected as a monument. Visitors can enter the main hut to experience something of what it woud have been like to spend the winter here. Later in the 1940s, the British chose the same small island for the location of their “Base E”. Again, visitors can enter the main hut and also the generator shed. Like the American base, there are other ancillary buildings that can’t be entered due to their status as protected monuments. There are permanent shutters on the windows of Base E, so your guide should provide you with torches if you venture inside. In a solemn reminder of the harshness of the continent, there is also a grave site where 2 expedition members are buried in coffins covered by simple stone cairns. An important breeding site for birds, Stonington Island supports a colony of over 130 pairs of imperial shags, as well as nesting sites for skuas and terns.
Day 7, AM
South of the Polar Circle
South of the Polar Circle
The Polar Circle is an imaginary line based on the earth’s axial tilt at 66° 33’ 44.8” North and South. By definition everything below the southern Polar Circle (i.e. further south) is Antarctica. In the case of the Antarctic Peninsula ships will try to go past the Biscoe Islands, heading for Marguerite Bay. There are very few scientific stations or bases south of the Antarctic Circle as the ice conditions can make it difficult to bring in personnel, material and provisions by ship. Argentina and the UK both maintain permanent stations in Marguerite Bay, while Chile has a summer station at the entrance to the bay.
Day 8, AM
South of the Polar Circle
South of the Polar Circle
The Polar Circle is an imaginary line based on the earth’s axial tilt at 66° 33’ 44.8” North and South. By definition everything below the southern Polar Circle (i.e. further south) is Antarctica. In the case of the Antarctic Peninsula ships will try to go past the Biscoe Islands, heading for Marguerite Bay. There are very few scientific stations or bases south of the Antarctic Circle as the ice conditions can make it difficult to bring in personnel, material and provisions by ship. Argentina and the UK both maintain permanent stations in Marguerite Bay, while Chile has a summer station at the entrance to the bay.
Day 9, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Wordie House
Wordie House, Winter Island
Nestled onto the only flat part of Winter Island, Wordie House is a hut built in 1947. It was named by a British Antarctic expedition of the time after James Wordie, who was the chief scientist on Shackleton’s famous 1914 Antarctic exploration. Before it closed in 1954, the hut was used to take meteorological readings using instruments stored inside special screens, one of which still stands today. These readings were among the most important and longest set of weather data ever recorded about the Antarctic, and helped scientists to a greater understanding of the meteorology of the continent. Wordie House was made a “Historic Site and Monument” in 1995 and has been looked after by the UK Antarctic Hertage Trust since 2009. There are almost 500 original artefacts still on the site, including original cans of coffee, records, pots and pans, plates, and more. This makes Wordie House a true time capsule from the golden age of Antarctic exploration and scientific research.The hut is now fully weathertight, and work continues on preserving this unique station. Visits to the site are managed by the nearby Ukrainian station Vernadsky, and you may well be briefed by the Base Commander or other official before you board your boats for the landing. Uniquely for such a historic site, visitors are allowed to roam freely under the supervision of their expert Antarctic guides. They will answer all your questions about the history of the hut, as well as the artifacts that you can find here. Visitors to Winter Island can also expect to see seabirds such as skuas and kelp gulls, seals and penguins.
Day 9, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Petermann Island
Petermann Island
Petermann Island marks the extremes for two Antarctic species - not bad for a small rock less than a mile long! This rocky outcrop that rises 500ft above the sea has a permanent covering of ice. It’s home to the northernost colony of Adelie penguins, but also the southernmost colony of Gentoo penguins. First napped by a French expedition in 1909, Petermann Island is also home to breeding colonies of skuas and Wilson’s storm petrels. There’s alos a good chance to observe Weddell, crabeater and fur seals. Visitors can hike up to the highest point of the island, where a cross and cairn remembers three members of the British Antarctic Survey who died in 1982 attempting to cross the sea ice from Petermann Island to Vernadsky station. There is also a refuge hut built by an Argentian expedition in 1955 whose red metal walls make a fantastic contrast against the snow and ice.
Day 9, PM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 10, AM
South Georgia
South Shetland Islands
The South Shetland Islands are located just north of the Antarctic Peninsula. Weather and ice conditions permitting, our goal is to attempt memorable shore landings daily and encounter gentoo, chinstrap, and Adélie penguin rookeries; Weddell, crabeater, and leopard seals; and orca, humpback, and minke whales in the cold Antarctic waters. The ship will attempt to reach the Antarctic Peninsula for a landing, weather and ice-permitting. The peninsula also has a remarkable human history; during the voyage we will learn about some of the most important and dramatic expeditions to this remote corner of the world.
Day 11, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 12, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 13, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 13, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark and Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

Where you will be

Dates & Prices

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Number of passengers
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Your ship: Silver Wind

Welcome aboard the Silver Wind, an elegant and versatile ship perfectly suited for your Arctic and Antarctic cruise. The Silver Wind underwent a major upgrade in 2018 and a second one in 2020, where it benefited from a new and improved ice-class hull. This strongly reinforced hull will make the Silver Wind one of the most adaptable cruise ships in the Silversea fleet. The service aboard the Silver Wind cruises are exquisite, with a total of 239 crew members ready and eager to serve a maximum of 274 passengers. Her timeless features and luxuriously relaxed atmosphere will make your Arctic or Antarctic cruise experience one to remember. The variety of suite options available on the Silver Wind suit all types of comfort levels. Each suite includes a fully equipped mini bar, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet, a bathrobe and slippers, Italian linens and for your personal preference, a selection of pillows and toiletries to choose from. Many of these beautiful suites come with balconies and range from 240 sq feet (ca. 22 m²) to the largest Owner’s Suite at 587sq feet (ca. 55 m²). The atmosphere aboard the Silver Wind Arctic or Antarctic cruises is international. English is the main language spoken, however, you will most likely meet passengers from all over the world. The mood is sophisticated and tranquil, appropriate for any guest to enjoy. The daytime dress code is casual, as the polar regions require suitable clothing. And within a 7-day cruise, you will be able to participate in one formal night. It is recommended ladies wear a cocktail or evening dress, while gentlemen wear a dark suit or tuxedo. Despite its intimate size, the Silver Wind offers a variety of amenities and entertainment options. Make your Polar cruise a perfect one with a full range of spa treatments at the Zagara Beauty Spa. Relax in the outdoor heated swimming pool, or try your luck at the Casino. The Silver Wind cruises also offer free fitness classes including Yoga, and Pilates as well as a small gym. Passengers of all ages can enjoy the Sports center equipped with a jogging track, a golf cage, paddle tennis, and a putting green. For those looking for a more educational experience during their Arctic or Antarctic cruise on board the Silver Wind, visit the beautiful Parisian Show Lounge for daily lectures as well as Trivia games, language lessons, live music, and more. The Library also offers audio-listening stations and on-demand movies. Make sure you head to the Observation Lounge for a 270-degree panoramic view of the incredible Polar horizons. Lastly, adults can enjoy the smoking lounge at the Connoisseur’s Corner, furnished with leather armchairs where one can purchase vintage wines, cognacs, and fine cigars.

Amenities

Cocktail Symbol
Bar
Casino Icon
Casino
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
Spa Icon
Spa
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Connoisseur's Corner Icon
Connoisseur's Corner
photo studio icon
Photo Studio
Observation Lounge Icon
Observation Lounge
Library Icon
Library
Conference room icon
Conference Room

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
The Silver Wind goes at lengths in order to...

Food & Drinks

The dining options aboard the Silver Wind cruises are nothing short of delicious. Your Arctic or Antarctic cruise will not be complete without tasting all the different flavors the ship has to offer. The Restaurant, an open-seating dining room, offers gourmet Mediterranean meals. Make a dinner reservation at Le Champagne, and enjoy signature French cuisine in an intimate setting. La Terraza is a complimentary buffet-style restaurant offering both indoor and outdoor seating. La Terraza transforms into a reservation-only Italian fare at dinnertime. The Pool Bar & Pool Grill serve fast food and drinks in the pool deck area. In the evening, the area is converted into an al fresco dining experience with classic seafood and steakhouse choices. The Grill offers gourmet dining under the stars. Its signature dishes include lava-rocks grilled meat, seafood, Mediterranean vegetables, and more. The “Black Rock Grill Experience” is a fun hands-on dining concept allowing guests to cook their own meat and seafood. Last but not least, the Bar offers passengers ample comfortable seating and complimentary cocktails. Enjoy live music performances, and for those brave enough, a dance floor. The best part? The all-inclusive Silversea package also includes gratuities. Tipping is included!