Silver Wind Polar Cruise

Ushuaia to Ushuaia

Experience nature at its most primal, all the while enjoying the best creature comforts on board.

Ushuaia to Ushuaia

On board the Silver Wind
11-day cruise
Antarctic Cruise
100 Reviews
5/5
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Pool
Join us for a journey to the last untouched continent. Antarctica offers spectacular icebergs and calving glaciers, as well as the possibility of up-close encounters with penguins ashore, seals sunbathing on slow-moving ice floes, and humpback or minke whales surfacing close to the ship. Weather depending, we will take daily Zodiac departures in Antarctica and cruise amidst colorful icebergs, or step ashore to visit a variety of penguin rookeries on excursions led by our team of natural history experts. Go kayaking in Antarctica under the guidance of certified instructors, and cross the incredible Drake Passage to look for pelagic birds, including petrels and prions. Throughout the voyage, learn about the geology, wildlife and history of this spectacular area from lecture presentations offered by your knowledgeable onboard Expedition Team.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 1, PM
Embarking ship
Embark
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 2, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
Antarctic Sound
Antarctic Sound
An adventure in its purest form, only a handful of people will ever be lucky enough to experience the majestic beauty of these monochrome landscapes first-hand. The Antarctic Sound will be one of your first encounters of this whitewash kingdom, located at the northerly tip of the Antarctic Peninsula - which sprawls up like a tentacle towards Tierra del Fuego, South America’s most southerly point, otherwise known as the ‘End of the World’. Taking its name from the first ship to brave the passageway between the peninsular and the Joinville Island groups back in 1902, the Sound is a raw, sensory assault of imposing iceberg slabs, broken away from the disintegrating Larsen Ice Shelf. Come face-to-face with stadium-sized islands of ice and meet the extraordinary birdlife that call this whitewash kingdom home.
Day 4, PM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 5, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 5, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour is a mile-wide cove on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first discovered by a Belgian Antarctic survey of 1898 and was then in regular use by whaling vessels in the early 1900s. The site is popular for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a beautiful location, providing stunning views. The exposed rocky shoreline contrasts with the permanent snow patches dotted on the higher ground above it. To the south, there is deep permanent snow and ice. Glaciers ring the harbour and steep peaks rise above. It’s glorious! The other reason to visit is the nesting colony of chinstrap penguins that have made their homes here. There’s a steep but safe hike up from the beach to the colony on higher ground. As well as the penguins, you will be rewarded with remarkable views of the bay, and the glacier that regularly calves into the waters.
Day 5, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Islands
Orne Islands
The Orne Islands are a cluster of small, low-lying rocky islands at the entrance to the Errera Channel. The largest island has moderate slopes leading to a rocky central ridge that has permanent snow banks. There are also three other small islets that make up the group. Your landing will be via a low rock platform on the north-west side of the main island. Once ashore, you can roam freely around the island under the supervision of your expert guides. The Orne Islands are home to Skuas, which nest in the rocky outcrops here, as well as other Antarctic seabirds and penguins. In winter, impressive snow cliffs can form near the landing site. To avoid disturbing the wildlife, numbers on the island are restricted, and during nesting seasons your guides may restrict the areas in which you can roam to protect nests.
Day 6, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Georges Point, Rongé Island
Georges Point, Rongé Island
Rongé Island is high and rocky. Some 5 miles long, it’s the largest of the islands that form the west side of the Errera Channel. Georges Point was first mapped in 1897 by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition and named after one of it’s members. You land on a rocky beach with a penguin colony at one end that your expert Antarctic guides will guide you around. They will also take you on a carefully marked trail up to the higher ground behind the beach giving you a great view down over the concentrations of penguins along the shore. There are also often Antarctic Fur Seals to be found here as well as plenty of sea birds. The rocky cliffs and height of the island make for some magnificent backdrops and great opportunities to capture the essence of the Antarctic in your photographs.
Day 6, AM
Cuverville Island
Cuverville Island
This small, steep-sided island is only 1.5 by 1.25 miles and two-thirds of it sits under a permanent ice-cap. On its northern shore is a pebble and boulder beach backed by steep cliffs where you will arrive by zodiac from your Antarctic cruise vessel and come ashore. At both ends of this beach are impressive Gentoo penguin colonies. You will be able to clearly see the trails they use to make their way too and from the water. There are other colonies and nesting sites on the higher ground behind the beach, and throughout the island. You can also see the evidence of the whaling activity that went on here in the early 1900s, including discarded whalebones and the remains of the equipment used to hall them ashore for processing. This small island is carefully protected - only one ship at a time may land passengers here and there are other restrictions to ensure the wildlife is not unnecessarily disturbed. Some areas of the island are closed to visitors, but the rest allows you to roam freely, and your expert guides will show you the resident flora and fauna, as well as explaining the island’s whaling history.
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Danco Island
Danco Island, Errera Channel
Topography: Danco Island is a one mile long island in the southern part of the Errera Channel. Its north shore is characterised by a wide flat cobbled beach with a long snow-free slope behind it which rises up to the island’s ice-covered summit. Permanent ice dominates the top and south side of the island. Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day (midnight to midnight), of which no more than 2 can carry over 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Landing Area: The preferred landing site is on the western end of the north shore, near the site of the former British base. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision. Behavior Ashore: All visits are to be conducted in accordance with the General Guidelines for Visitors to the Antarctic.Avoid walking in the deep snow pathways created by penguins. Cautionary Notes: "Boat drivers should be aware of shallow, rocky approaches to the landing beach. The permanent ice slopes are crevassed and dangerous. They should only be accessed by those with suitable alpine experience and training and using suitable equipment (eg, roped access). Beware of wash from calving icebergs in beach area, particularly on the beach to the south of the site of the former Base ‘O’."
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Neko Harbor
Neko Harbour
Neko Harbour is an inlet on Andvord Bay in the Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered by a Belgian expedition in the early 1900s. It was named after The Neko, a Scottish whaling vessel that worked these waters between 1910 and 1925. She sheltered inlet has a beach and rocky outcrop that is surrounded by glaciers and towering cliffs. This is a popular site as the glaciers that surround this bay regularly calve during the season, leading to some stunning photo and video opportunities if you are lucky. There used to be a refuge hut here that was built by Argentina in 1949, and was in irregular use all the way until 2009 when it was destroyed in a severe storm. It has since been cleared from the site, with just a few remains now to be seen. The gentoo penguin colony that lives here and used to surround the refuge hut don’t seem to mind! Their noisy cries will great you as you land on the beach. You can often also see Weddell seals here in the sea or hauled out near the beach. There are also regularly skuas and kelp gulls here.
Day 7, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Jougla Point
Jougla Point
Found at the western end of Wiencke Island in Port Lockroy, Jougla Point is a very rocky peninsula with many small coves. It was first mapped in 1903 by a French Antarctic expedition. The approach to the point is nothing short of dramatic! You will have stunning views of glaciers, snow cornices and steep, crevassed snowfields as you enter the harbour. Your landing here will be against rocks on the northeastern end of the point. Like many bays and coves in the area, Jougla Point has artefacts and remains from the whaling industry. You will see whale bones where the carcasses were dragged ashore for processing. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to observe the Gentoo penguin colony as well as the blue-eyed shag nesting areas. Other wildlife you can observe are kelp gulls and skuas, with seals a frequent site. You will be able to roam freely around the beach area to observe and photograph, with your guides on hand to answer any questions you may have and to ensure visitors keep away from any closed breeding areas.
Day 7, AM
Goudier Island
Goudier Island
Goudier Island is a small, low-lying island of bare, polished rock. Often surrounding by sea ice, snow cover usually melts away by the end of the summer. Goudier is home to “Base A” - established by the British in wartime in 1944 - which was used as a scientific research station until the early 60s. After fallen into disrepair, the station was restored in the 1990s, and is now looked after by a Heritage Trust. The base is permanently occupied, and the inhabitants still conduct important survey work on the penguin colony for the British Antarctic Survey. You will usually be briefed by the Base Leader before you land ashore, and only 35 visitors are allowed inside the Base at any time. This is to ensure the artifacts and the fabric of the base are preserved. This “time capsule” gives a fascinating insight into the work and lives of early Antarctic research pioneers and how they lived. Access to the rest of the island is usually restricted to marked paths, both to protect wildlife and because the surface is uneven and slippery. However, you will be able to observe the resident penguin colony, and can also spot other birds and seals on the shores and in the sea.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Yalour Islands
Yalour Islands
The Yalour Islands are a 1.5-mile long group of small islands and protruding rocks. Most of the islands are steep-sided or unsuitable for landing due to sea conditions, but the largest island has some cobbled beaches where you can put ashore. Visitors come here to make the short climb up from the beach to the Adelie penguin breeding colonies. There are thought to be around 8,000 breeding pairs of Adelies in the Yalour Islands, and they have nested on every bit of rock they can find that’s not snow-covered. It makes for an amazing sight as you come in to land on the beach! Photographic opportunities here are excellent. The high mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula form a stunning backdrop to shots of the Adelie nest sites. Your expert guides will lead you around, showing you the best sites and answering all your questions about the penguins and their lives.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Wordie House
Wordie House, Winter Island
Nestled onto the only flat part of Winter Island, Wordie House is a hut built in 1947. It was named by a British Antarctic expedition of the time after James Wordie, who was the chief scientist on Shackleton’s famous 1914 Antarctic exploration. Before it closed in 1954, the hut was used to take meteorological readings using instruments stored inside special screens, one of which still stands today. These readings were among the most important and longest set of weather data ever recorded about the Antarctic, and helped scientists to a greater understanding of the meteorology of the continent. Wordie House was made a “Historic Site and Monument” in 1995 and has been looked after by the UK Antarctic Hertage Trust since 2009. There are almost 500 original artefacts still on the site, including original cans of coffee, records, pots and pans, plates, and more. This makes Wordie House a true time capsule from the golden age of Antarctic exploration and scientific research.The hut is now fully weathertight, and work continues on preserving this unique station. Visits to the site are managed by the nearby Ukrainian station Vernadsky, and you may well be briefed by the Base Commander or other official before you board your boats for the landing. Uniquely for such a historic site, visitors are allowed to roam freely under the supervision of their expert Antarctic guides. They will answer all your questions about the history of the hut, as well as the artifacts that you can find here. Visitors to Winter Island can also expect to see seabirds such as skuas and kelp gulls, seals and penguins.
Day 8, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Hannah Point
Hannah Point
Topography: Hannah Point (the Point) is a narrow peninsula undulating upward to knife-edged ridges and vertical cliff edges 30-50 metres above sea level. There is loose scree on higher slopes and ridges, evidence of rock falls, and a Jaspar mineral vein. Ash-covered slopes link the Point to the flat open beach area of Walker Bay. Visitor Impact: Temporary paths form in the loose volcanic ash slopes closer to Walker Bay, and compacted paths are evident around the Point, formed by wildlife and possibly visitor use. In two reported instances since 1995 elephant seals have fallen from the cliff top wallow near the Jasper Dyke, due to disturbance. Potential Impact:Erosion and disturbance of vegetation and wildlife, especially as visitor space is limited on the Point. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Comments: No more than 100 visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders, with not more than 50 on the Point. The Point: Given the limited space at this site, visits are strongly discouraged from the start of the breeding season (October) until after early penguin incubation phase (mid-January). After then, maximum 1 ship per day (midnight to midnight). Visits to last no longer than 6 hours. No visitors on the Point between 22:00hrs and 04:00hrs (local time). Walker Bay: a maximum of 2 ships per day (midnight to midnight). Landing Area: Primary: The small cobble beach on the northern coast of Hannah Point.<br />Secondary: If conditions permit, an alternative landing area is the flat open area of Walker Bay, to the north of the Point.<br /> Closed Area: Closed Area A: Cliff area with nesting southern giant petrels.<br />Closed Area B: Rocky outcrops with nesting southern giant petrels, including a 50 metre buffer zone.<br /> Guided Walking Area: Because of restricted visitor space, all walks around the Point should be strictly controlled in guided groups of no more than 15-20 visitors, which are well spaced and which follow the same path. Visitors walking on the Point should proceed in single file along a designated route, avoiding wildlife and other sensitive features. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely, but under supervision, on the beach in Walker Bay, avoiding Closed Area B. Behavior Ashore: All visits are to be conducted in accordance with the General Guidelines for Visitors to the Antarctic.Be vigilant for nesting southern giant petrels and, when on the same level or higher elevation than the birds, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: The Gentoo colonies are thought to be expanding and the Point and the landing beach may be quite crowded as the breeding season progresses. The primary landing beach may be crowded with wildlife – under such circumstances it would not be possible to make a landing and maintain the required precautionary distances. Both landing beaches are prone to swells. Be careful near the jasper dyke. It is brittle and may crumble. Exercise particular caution not to disturb animals near cliff edges. If they are disturbed, they may retreat and fall.
Day 8, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Barrientos Island
Barrientos Island (Aitcho Islands)
Topography: This 1.5km island’s north coast is dominated by steep cliffs, reaching a height of approximately 70 metres, with a gentle slope down to the south coast. The eastern and western ends of the island are black sand and cobbled beaches. Columnar basalt outcrops are a notable feature of the western end. Visitor Impact: The erosion of multiple footpaths through vegetation between the eastern and western ends of the island. Potential Impact: Further damage to the vegetation and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: eastern end of the island; landing either on the sand beach to the north, or on the cobbled southern beach.<br />Secondary: northern shore of the western end of the island, with easiest access at high water. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Monitoring sites for chinstrap penguins above and southeast of the eastern landing area.<br />Closed Area B: Central part of the island covered by a very extensive moss carpet and the northern cliffs where southern giant petrels nest.<br />Closed Area C: Knoll on the southwestern tip of the island where southern giant petrels nest. Free Roaming Area: Visitors can roam freely, but under supervision, anywhere except the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetated areas. Elsewhere, tread gently to avoid disturbing ground surfaces which may host inconspicuous biota.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: Stay clear of cliffs and vertical walls and stacks as these are prone to rock falls and slides.
Day 8, PM
Northeast Beach map
Northeast beach of Ardley Island
Ardley Island is a small, rocky island about a mile long. It was first charted in 1935 but mistaken for a headland. It was not until aerial surveys years later that it was reclassified as an island. Ardley Island is an active summer research station, and you will often see scientists and researchers at work here. The huts that you can see from the beach are part of the research station and not able to be visited. The landing on the beach is just below the lighthouse, a distinctive feature that you will have spotted from out to see. This gently sloping cobble beach is the only place that visitors can arrive on Ardley. Visitor number are restricted due to the importance of the island as a breeding site for antarctic bird species. During your excursion on the island you will see a large gentoo penguin colony, as well as lesser numbers of Adelie and chinstrap penguins. You can also see southern giant petrels, Wilson's petrels, black-bellied storm petrels, Cape petrels, skuas and Antarctic terns.
Day 8, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island is made up of the cone of an active shield volcano. It last erupted in 1969. Its flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbour, although Baily Point is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream forms a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving at a time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Point include Antarctic Fur Seals who regular haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Point.
Day 9, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 10, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 11, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 11, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark and Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

Where you will be

Dates & Prices

Select date and passengers
Number of passengers
2

Your ship: Silver Wind

Welcome aboard the Silver Wind, an elegant and versatile ship perfectly suited for your Arctic and Antarctic cruise. The Silver Wind underwent a major upgrade in 2018 and a second one in 2020, where it benefited from a new and improved ice-class hull. This strongly reinforced hull will make the Silver Wind one of the most adaptable cruise ships in the Silversea fleet. The service aboard the Silver Wind cruises are exquisite, with a total of 239 crew members ready and eager to serve a maximum of 274 passengers. Her timeless features and luxuriously relaxed atmosphere will make your Arctic or Antarctic cruise experience one to remember. The variety of suite options available on the Silver Wind suit all types of comfort levels. Each suite includes a fully equipped mini bar, a marble bathroom, a walk-in closet, a bathrobe and slippers, Italian linens and for your personal preference, a selection of pillows and toiletries to choose from. Many of these beautiful suites come with balconies and range from 240 sq feet (ca. 22 m²) to the largest Owner’s Suite at 587sq feet (ca. 55 m²). The atmosphere aboard the Silver Wind Arctic or Antarctic cruises is international. English is the main language spoken, however, you will most likely meet passengers from all over the world. The mood is sophisticated and tranquil, appropriate for any guest to enjoy. The daytime dress code is casual, as the polar regions require suitable clothing. And within a 7-day cruise, you will be able to participate in one formal night. It is recommended ladies wear a cocktail or evening dress, while gentlemen wear a dark suit or tuxedo. Despite its intimate size, the Silver Wind offers a variety of amenities and entertainment options. Make your Polar cruise a perfect one with a full range of spa treatments at the Zagara Beauty Spa. Relax in the outdoor heated swimming pool, or try your luck at the Casino. The Silver Wind cruises also offer free fitness classes including Yoga, and Pilates as well as a small gym. Passengers of all ages can enjoy the Sports center equipped with a jogging track, a golf cage, paddle tennis, and a putting green. For those looking for a more educational experience during their Arctic or Antarctic cruise on board the Silver Wind, visit the beautiful Parisian Show Lounge for daily lectures as well as Trivia games, language lessons, live music, and more. The Library also offers audio-listening stations and on-demand movies. Make sure you head to the Observation Lounge for a 270-degree panoramic view of the incredible Polar horizons. Lastly, adults can enjoy the smoking lounge at the Connoisseur’s Corner, furnished with leather armchairs where one can purchase vintage wines, cognacs, and fine cigars.

Amenities

Cocktail Symbol
Bar
Casino Icon
Casino
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
Spa Icon
Spa
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Connoisseur's Corner Icon
Connoisseur's Corner
photo studio icon
Photo Studio
Observation Lounge Icon
Observation Lounge
Library Icon
Library
Conference room icon
Conference Room

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
The Silver Wind goes at lengths in order to...

Food & Drinks

The dining options aboard the Silver Wind cruises are nothing short of delicious. Your Arctic or Antarctic cruise will not be complete without tasting all the different flavors the ship has to offer. The Restaurant, an open-seating dining room, offers gourmet Mediterranean meals. Make a dinner reservation at Le Champagne, and enjoy signature French cuisine in an intimate setting. La Terraza is a complimentary buffet-style restaurant offering both indoor and outdoor seating. La Terraza transforms into a reservation-only Italian fare at dinnertime. The Pool Bar & Pool Grill serve fast food and drinks in the pool deck area. In the evening, the area is converted into an al fresco dining experience with classic seafood and steakhouse choices. The Grill offers gourmet dining under the stars. Its signature dishes include lava-rocks grilled meat, seafood, Mediterranean vegetables, and more. The “Black Rock Grill Experience” is a fun hands-on dining concept allowing guests to cook their own meat and seafood. Last but not least, the Bar offers passengers ample comfortable seating and complimentary cocktails. Enjoy live music performances, and for those brave enough, a dance floor. The best part? The all-inclusive Silversea package also includes gratuities. Tipping is included!

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