Silver Cloud

Punta Arenas to Ushuaia

A journey that every traveller has dreams of –From Patagonia’s Punta Arenas to stepping onto the Antarctic Peninsula

Punta Arenas to Ushuaia

On board the Silver Cloud
17-day cruise
Antarctic Cruise
100 Reviews
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It’s a journey that every traveler has dreamed of making – taking the Strait of Magellan from Patagonia’s Punta Arenas to step foot on the Antarctic Peninsula. But first get to grips with South Georgia – said to have more wildlife per square foot than any other destination on the planet. Continue your epic voyage by crossing the Drake Passage for seabird spotting opportunities extraordinaire before arriving in Antarctica proper.

Your itinerary

Day 1, AM
Punta Arenas
Arrival to Punta Arenas
a wind-whipped, fractured land of islands, glacial fjords and mountains, which drop away towards Antarctica. A hardy city, where the temperature hovers in single figures throughout much of the year, Punta Arenas nevertheless offers a warm welcome and refuge, ahead of - and following - epic adventures and expeditions south across the Drake Passage. Captain Scott stopped here in 1904 – testing the postal service sending 400 letters of his successful return - and the city welcomed the rescued Ernest Shackleton and his Endurance crew to these shores in 1916. Punta Arenas is a remote place, but with custom-free status, and more than 120,000 people calling it home it's also surprisingly cosmopolitan. The commercial centre of Magallanes Punta Arenas is fueled by Chilean oil and gas - and establishing itself as a global centre for Antarctic research, with teams from various countries basing themselves here. The town is built around the Plaza de Armas, its central square - be sure to kiss the toe of the Monumento del Indio Patagon statue, said to guarantee you good luck on your return.
Day 1, PM
Punta Arenas
Embark in Punta Arenas
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 2, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 5, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 6, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 7, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 8, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 9, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 10, AM
Elephant Island
Elephant Island
The exploits of its early explorers have immortalised this harsh, monochrome island in the tomes of human history. Believed to take its name from the elephant seals that early explorers spotted lolling on its rocks, the volcanic island was not properly explored until 1916 - when Ernest Shackleton and his men were stricken by the weather and sought salvation on its shores. Their story of survival, stranded in this barren land, is one of humanity’s most evocative and inspiring accounts. Elephant Island is written deep into the legend of Antarctic exploration, and you’ll discover Shackleton’s tale for yourself as you arrive in the island’s icy realm. The remarkable, slowly flowing Endurance Glacier - which you’ll see on arrival here - takes its name from their ship, The Endurance.
Day 10, PM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 11, AM
Astrolabe Island
Astrolabe Island
Topography: A 3-mile-long rocky island situated 14 miles (22.53 km) NW off of Cape Ducorps on the Trinity Peninsula. Beach on the northern shore of Astrolabe Island. A small fractured boulder field of weathered rocks lies on the path between the beach and the penguin colony. <br></br> Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Damage to fractured boulders field, repeated walking over the field will dislodge the plates of rock so that eventually the cracked boulder effect will be lost. <br></br> Landing Requirements: Max pax on board: 500. Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers. <br></br> Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00Comments: 50 visitors only at any one time on walk to chinstrap colony. <br></br> Landing Area: Primary landing site – either end of main crescent shaped beach on eastern side of small rocky peninsula, rocks behind the beach contain chinstrap penguin colony. Antarctic fur seals are likely to be present in late season making landing difficult. <br /><br />Secondary landing site - Opposite side of peninsula on the rocky shore below the penguin colony. Extreme caution should be taken on very slippery rocks.<br /> <br></br> Closed Area: Small area of fractured boulders on the walk from primary landing site to the penguin colony. Can be skirted on the lower rocks. <br></br> Guided Walking Area: Short walk from the beach up the rocks to chinstrap penguin colony, avoiding the closed area. Only 50 at a time on the walk, which should be marked and closely guided. Do not walk up into the scree slopes where birds are nesting. <br></br> Free Roaming Area: Visitors are free to roam on the upper shore of the long stony landing beach. <br></br> Behavior Ashore: Stay clear of - and do not venture on - slopes where chinstrap penguins are nesting.Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. <br></br> Cautionary Notes: "• Be careful of hidden rocks on approach to landing sites. Ice conditions on approach to the beach can change rapidly – extreme caution should be used in approaching and departing the island. • Be extremely careful walking on rocks, especially close to the secondary landing site, which are very slippery and covered in guano."
Day 11, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Brown Bluff
Brown Bluff
Topography: 1.5km long cobble and ash beach rising increasingly steeply towards towering red-brown tuff cliffs, which are embedded with volcanic bombs. The cliffs are heavily eroded, resulting in loose scree and rock and ice falls on higher slopes and large, wind eroded boulders on the beach. At high water the beach area can be restricted. Permanent ice and tidewater glaciers surround the site to the east and west occasionally filling the beach with brash ice. Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Trampling of moss and lichen on moraine. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per calendar day, of which no more than 1 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: The eastern end of the beach, to the east of the three large boulders at the western end of the snow slope - protected by two reefs. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Kelp gull and Gentoo penguin colony in the boulder area behind the landing beach, extending from the three large boulders up the small gully running south-southeast behind the moraine ridge. <br />Closed Area B: From the edge of the Adélie penguin colony (close to the end of reef),including all the beach and up the slope encompassing the whole colony. <br /> Guided Walking Area: Visits to the edge of the Adélie penguin colony should be closely supervised. <br />Visits to the snow petrel nests on the slopes behind the penguin rookeries should be done in closely guided groups with a ratio of 1 guide to 5 visitors – where the guide knows the location of the nest in advance. A minimum distance of 20 metres should be kept from the nest. Care should be taken not to disturb loose rocks. <br />Glacial walking - The route along the snow covered ground on the edge of the moraine ridge to the east of the landing beach should be clearly marked, or guided. Visitors should conduct the walk in single file. <br /><br /> Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely along the main flat beach area between the landing site and the closed areas. Visitors should remain above the high tide mark as far as possible, leaving beach free for penguins to access the sea. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Take care not to disturb nesting sea birds.Visitors should remain above the high tide mark and at high water be aware it may be necessary to have visitors walk in small groups escorted by guides. Cautionary Notes: "Strong winds are a feature of this area, and pack and brash ice are frequently blown onto the beach area. Rock falls occur from the cliffs and steeper scree slopes. The primary landing beach may be crowded with wildlife. Landing beach is prone to swells from the north and the north-east. Hazardous rocks and reefs lie immediately off shore. Scientific equipment may be found in the area, take care not to disturb the equipment."
Day 12, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Paulet Island
Paulet Island
Paulet Island is a striking sight. This circular rock is only 1 mile in diameter, yet it has a volcanic cone that rises to over 1100 feet at its center. First mapped in 1839, Paulet Island is home to a huge penguin colony. Some 100,000 breeding pairs of Adelie penguins live here, a truly remarkable sight and sound! You will also see other sea birds on your visit, including shags, snow petrels and kelp gulls. Another fascinating aspect of Paulet Island is the historic shelter that dates back to 1903. A Swedish ship was crushed by the ice pack nearby, and survivors of the wreck built a stone hut to shelter them from the harsh winter conditions. There is also a cairn built on the highest point of the island that they used to attract attention for any rescue. There is also a grave marker for one expedition member who did not survive. Because the island is so densely packed with wildlife, visitors will be escorted in small groups by experienced Antarctic guides. This ensures that the breeding birds are disturbed as little as possible, and that the shelter site is protected. Fur seals are often also seen on the shores here, and in the peak breeding season you may find that some of the walking trails around the island are closed due to the sheer numbers of wonderful creatures that choose to raise their young here.
Day 12, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island, Vega Island
Devil Island is well-named! This narrow, rocky island has a low valley in the middle, with two peaks at either end. This gives it an uncanny “devil’s horns” look! Devil Island gives an opportunity for some photographing some breathtaking views. From the landing site you are greeted by some spectacular volcanic formations. From here, you can hike to the top of one of the peaks, which overlooks an Adelie penguin colony nestling below in a natural bowl formation. But the star of the show here is the remarkable 360 degree viewpoint you get from the top. Stunning antarctic vistas that you don’t want to miss, so ensure camera batteries are charged and spare memory cards are ready! From the high vantage point you might spot fur seals, crabeater seals, and a variety of seabirds. It really makes the short, but steep climb worth it. Your expert Antarctic guides will show you the way and point out any wildlife you may have missed.
Day 12, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 13, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour is a mile-wide cove on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first discovered by a Belgian Antarctic survey of 1898 and was then in regular use by whaling vessels in the early 1900s. The site is popular for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a beautiful location, providing stunning views. The exposed rocky shoreline contrasts with the permanent snow patches dotted on the higher ground above it. To the south, there is deep permanent snow and ice. Glaciers ring the harbour and steep peaks rise above. It’s glorious! The other reason to visit is the nesting colony of chinstrap penguins that have made their homes here. There’s a steep but safe hike up from the beach to the colony on higher ground. As well as the penguins, you will be rewarded with remarkable views of the bay, and the glacier that regularly calves into the waters.
Day 13, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Islands
Orne Islands
The Orne Islands are a cluster of small, low-lying rocky islands at the entrance to the Errera Channel. The largest island has moderate slopes leading to a rocky central ridge that has permanent snow banks. There are also three other small islets that make up the group. Your landing will be via a low rock platform on the north-west side of the main island. Once ashore, you can roam freely around the island under the supervision of your expert guides. The Orne Islands are home to Skuas, which nest in the rocky outcrops here, as well as other Antarctic seabirds and penguins. In winter, impressive snow cliffs can form near the landing site. To avoid disturbing the wildlife, numbers on the island are restricted, and during nesting seasons your guides may restrict the areas in which you can roam to protect nests.
Day 13, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Neko Harbor
Neko Harbour
Neko Harbour is an inlet on Andvord Bay in the Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered by a Belgian expedition in the early 1900s. It was named after The Neko, a Scottish whaling vessel that worked these waters between 1910 and 1925. She sheltered inlet has a beach and rocky outcrop that is surrounded by glaciers and towering cliffs. This is a popular site as the glaciers that surround this bay regularly calve during the season, leading to some stunning photo and video opportunities if you are lucky. There used to be a refuge hut here that was built by Argentina in 1949, and was in irregular use all the way until 2009 when it was destroyed in a severe storm. It has since been cleared from the site, with just a few remains now to be seen. The gentoo penguin colony that lives here and used to surround the refuge hut don’t seem to mind! Their noisy cries will great you as you land on the beach. You can often also see Weddell seals here in the sea or hauled out near the beach. There are also regularly skuas and kelp gulls here.
Day 13, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Danco Island
Danco Island, Errera Channel
Topography: Danco Island is a one mile long island in the southern part of the Errera Channel. Its north shore is characterised by a wide flat cobbled beach with a long snow-free slope behind it which rises up to the island’s ice-covered summit. Permanent ice dominates the top and south side of the island. Potential Impact: Disturbance of wildlife. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day (midnight to midnight), of which no more than 2 can carry over 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Landing Area: The preferred landing site is on the western end of the north shore, near the site of the former British base. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision. Behavior Ashore: All visits are to be conducted in accordance with the General Guidelines for Visitors to the Antarctic.Avoid walking in the deep snow pathways created by penguins. Cautionary Notes: "Boat drivers should be aware of shallow, rocky approaches to the landing beach. The permanent ice slopes are crevassed and dangerous. They should only be accessed by those with suitable alpine experience and training and using suitable equipment (eg, roped access). Beware of wash from calving icebergs in beach area, particularly on the beach to the south of the site of the former Base ‘O’."
Day 14, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 14, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Turret Point
Turret Point
Turret Point is well-named! As you approach this part of King George Island you will see the unmistakable rock “stacks” which made this the obvious name when the point was first mapped in 1937 by a British exploration mission. The remarkable landscape is formed by the glacier that forms the backdrop to the gently sloping landing beach here. It’s impressively gnarled and crevassed front makes a stunning backdrop to the wildlife activity here. The beach is extremely popular with antarctic species. As well as chinstrap penguins, the area is frequented by giant petrels, blue-eyed shags, and kelp gulls. Elephant seals can often be seen wallowing in the shallows here, and fur seals are frequent visitors, too. You will be able to walk up to the face of the glacier, and your expert guides will lead you along the melt stream bed, to avoid trampling the fragile antarctic flora that grows here.
Day 14, AM
Penguin Island Map
Penguin Island
Penguin Island was first record in 1820 during a British expedition. It was so-named because of the vast numbers of penguins that could be seen along its shoreline from the ship as it passed by. Penguin Island lies just off the south coast of the much bigger King George Island. It’s ice-free and is oval-shaped, some 1 mile long. It’s standout geological feature is the 560ft tall Deacon Peak - a volcanic cone that is though to have last been active about 300 years ago. Penguin Island is an internationally-recognised important area for birds. As well as colonies of Adelie and Chinstrap penguins, the island is also home to large breeding colonies of southern giant petrels, antarctic terns and kelp gulls. You can often see Weddell seals and sometimes southern elephant seals on the beaches here, too. For those feeling fit, there is a marked path that will take you up to the top of Deacon Peak. This offers unparalleled views over the whole island and beyond across King George Bay. Do note, however, that this part of the antarctic is known for its quickly changing weather, so if the opportunity to presents itself, take it!
Day 14, PM
Northeast Beach map
Northeast beach of Ardley Island
Ardley Island is a small, rocky island about a mile long. It was first charted in 1935 but mistaken for a headland. It was not until aerial surveys years later that it was reclassified as an island. Ardley Island is an active summer research station, and you will often see scientists and researchers at work here. The huts that you can see from the beach are part of the research station and not able to be visited. The landing on the beach is just below the lighthouse, a distinctive feature that you will have spotted from out to see. This gently sloping cobble beach is the only place that visitors can arrive on Ardley. Visitor number are restricted due to the importance of the island as a breeding site for antarctic bird species. During your excursion on the island you will see a large gentoo penguin colony, as well as lesser numbers of Adelie and chinstrap penguins. You can also see southern giant petrels, Wilson's petrels, black-bellied storm petrels, Cape petrels, skuas and Antarctic terns.
Day 14, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Barrientos Island
Barrientos Island (Aitcho Islands)
Topography: This 1.5km island’s north coast is dominated by steep cliffs, reaching a height of approximately 70 metres, with a gentle slope down to the south coast. The eastern and western ends of the island are black sand and cobbled beaches. Columnar basalt outcrops are a notable feature of the western end. Visitor Impact: The erosion of multiple footpaths through vegetation between the eastern and western ends of the island. Potential Impact: Further damage to the vegetation and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: eastern end of the island; landing either on the sand beach to the north, or on the cobbled southern beach.<br />Secondary: northern shore of the western end of the island, with easiest access at high water. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Monitoring sites for chinstrap penguins above and southeast of the eastern landing area.<br />Closed Area B: Central part of the island covered by a very extensive moss carpet and the northern cliffs where southern giant petrels nest.<br />Closed Area C: Knoll on the southwestern tip of the island where southern giant petrels nest. Free Roaming Area: Visitors can roam freely, but under supervision, anywhere except the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetated areas. Elsewhere, tread gently to avoid disturbing ground surfaces which may host inconspicuous biota.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: Stay clear of cliffs and vertical walls and stacks as these are prone to rock falls and slides.
Day 15, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 16, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 17, AM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 17, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark and Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

Where you will be

South Georgia – In South Georgia we will land at old whaling stations, depending on landing conditions hope to visit a huge King Penguin colony, see the Museum at Grytviken, and do Zodiac cruises looking for wildlife. Antarctic Sound, Antarctica – We will travel to see tabular icebergs in the Antarctic Sound. The Sound usually shows massive continental icebergs, which rise out of the water like giant white-blue blocks. Depending on ice conditions Zodiac cruises and a landing might be possible. Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica – We will explore the Antarctic Peninsula from the Silver Cloud, on Zodiac cruises and via landings to see seals and penguin colonies. This promontory of land is the furthest-north extension of mainland Antarctica. Your excursions will be expertly planned by your Captain and Expedition Leader according to weather and ice conditions. South Shetland Islands, Antarctica – Several landing sites and remains of whaling stations can be found in the South Shetland Islands. This grouping of islands is 75 miles north of the Antarctic Peninsula and holds sixteen research stations run by Argentina, the US, Chile, Spain and several other countries. Sites for your activities will be selected based on weather and ice conditions. Drake Passage – We will pass through the Drake Passage, a 600-mile wide expanse that marks the convergence of the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern Oceans. This is an excellent area for whale-watching and pelagic birding. Look for albatrosses and Southern Giant Petrels, as well as Cape Petrels, prions and storm-petrels. Kayaking in Antarctica – Silver Cloud offers the opportunity to kayak in a small group under the guidance of certified kayak instructors. These special excursions are a chance to appreciate the wilds of Antarctica in peaceful silence.

Dates & Prices

Select date and passengers
Number of passengers
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Your ship: Silver Cloud

Welcome aboard the Silver Cloud, the luxurious expedition ship equipped for adventure and comfort. Spacious, yet intimate, the Silver Cloud accommodates no more than 240 guests. Refurbished in 2017, the cruise ship’s capacity was greatly reduced. Fewer passengers enables faster disembarking thus spending more time on expeditions. With her 1-1 guest to staff ratio, this ship epitomizes exceptional service and enjoyment. The yacht-like Silver Cloud is particularly built for the Arctic and Antarctic. Its smaller size can navigate through more narrow rivers and harbors, while its C Class ice-strengthened hull can safely cruise through floating ice. A cruise aboard the Silver Cloud is one of luxury and excitement. All suites on the Silver Cloud are elegantly designed and equipped with a butler at your service. About 80% of the suites include a veranda, where you can get up close and personal to extraordinary wildlife right from your bedroom. Some suites also offer 100% ocean views. Can you imagine drinking your morning coffee watching whales breach at your panoramic window? The ship also offers 26 family-friendly suites with a 3-guest capacity. All suites also feature a bar stocked with your favorites, a choice of pillows, complimentary Wi-Fi, a flat-screen TV with an interactive Media Library, and much more. The Silver Cloud expedition cruises offer a friendly and intimate atmosphere, where guests can feel at home as they embark on a once in a lifetime adventure. In addition to luxurious suites, guests can enjoy plenty of outdoor viewing space on the 700m2 deck and an elegant heated swimming pool for movement or relaxation. In the evening, the outdoor space becomes an open-air dining venue offering classic steakhouse, seafood, vegetarian, and healthy options. Guests will be able to enjoy the Zàgara Beauty Spa which was first introduced on Silversea’s flagship, Silver Muse. Zàgara combines its beautiful Italian heritage with a nurturing mind and body philosophy, meeting your well-being needs with pride. The excursions included in your price are led by knowledgeable staff, including marine biologists, geologists, anthropologists, and more. Learn from your 20 Expedition Experts in non-polar regions and 22 in polar regions. The experience is enhanced through the onboard lecture program. Take advantage of the lecture hall where you can hear a wide range of talks, watch photo presentations, and participate in the daily recap. Unique to Silver Cloud, guests will also benefit from a newly installed Photo Studio where guests can edit content right on board. Guests can take advantage of this creative space and learn to master the art of digital photography. The Photo Studio offers masterclasses, a dedicated photo manager at your service, and an editing suite where guests can turn their incredible photographs into prints. The state-of-the-art equipment accommodates both MAC and PC users. The Silver Cloud is also equipped with 18 zodiacs offering a closer look at the surroundings and making on-shore explorations possible. 10 complimentary kayaks are also available for those seeking a little extra adventure.

Amenities

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Bar
Spa Icon
Spa
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Library Icon
Library
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Observation Lounge Icon
Observation Lounge
Connoisseur's Corner Icon
Connoisseur's Corner
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Photo Studio

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.

Food & Drinks

The Silver Cloud is renowned for its all-inclusive gourmet cuisine. Guests have plenty of opportunities to dine at each one of the ship’s 4 restaurants: The Dining Room, The Relais & Châteaux, La Terrazza, and The Grill. The Grill also offers gourmet dining under the stars. Its signature dishes include lava-rocks grilled meat, seafood, Mediterranean vegetables, and more. The “Black Rock Grill Experience” is a fun hands-on dining concept allowing guests to cook their own meat and seafood. In-suite dining is also available. Guests are offered a generous selection of all-inclusive beverages, wines, and spirit throughout their time aboard.

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