An Antarctica Cruise on board the G Expedition with Polartours

Spirit of Shackleton

This 21-day voyage illuminates Ernest Shackleton’s legend and recounts his courageous exploration of Antarctica

Spirit of Shackleton

On board the G Expedition
21-day cruise
Antarctic Cruise
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24h Doctor Station
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Kayaks
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Experience vast penguin rookeries and seal colonies on this awe-inspiring voyage to Antarctica, South Georgia, and the Falkland Islands. This 21-day voyage illuminates Ernest Shackleton’s legend and recounts his courageous exploration of Antarctica. You’ll visit historical sites of past explorers, as well as Shackleton’s final resting place — the wildlife-rich island of South Georgia. Antarctica is beyond comprehension and sure to amaze any traveller seeking a true adventure to the world’s most remote wilderness.

Your itinerary

Day 1, PM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 2, AM
morning in Ushuaia
Morning in Ushuaia
Enjoy a free morning in Ushuaia. The morning before you embark on your Antarctic cruise is for you to visit the beautiful port city of Ushuaia.
Day 2, PM
Embarking ship
Embark
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 2, PM
Beagle Channel
Sail the Beagle Channel & Lectures
The Beagle Channel is a strait in Tierra del Fuego Archipelago on the extreme southern tip of South America between Chile and Argentina. The Beagle Channel is about 240 kilometres (130 nmi; 150 mi) long and is about 5 kilometres (3 nmi; 3 mi) wide at its narrowest point. It extends from Nueva Island in the east to Darwin Sound and Cook Bay of the Pacific Ocean in the west. Some 50 kilometres (27 nmi; 31 mi) from its western end it divides into two branches, north and south of Gordon Island. The southwest branch between Hoste Island and Gordon Island enters Cook Bay. The northwest branch between Gordon Island and Isla Grande enters Darwin Sound connecting to the Pacific Ocean by the O'Brien Channel and the Ballenero Channel. The biggest settlement on the channel is Ushuaia in Argentina followed by Puerto Williams in Chile. These are two of the southernmost settlements of the world.
Day 2, PM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 3, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 4, PM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 5, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Barrientos Island
Barrientos Island (Aitcho Islands)
Topography: This 1.5km island’s north coast is dominated by steep cliffs, reaching a height of approximately 70 metres, with a gentle slope down to the south coast. The eastern and western ends of the island are black sand and cobbled beaches. Columnar basalt outcrops are a notable feature of the western end. Visitor Impact: The erosion of multiple footpaths through vegetation between the eastern and western ends of the island. Potential Impact: Further damage to the vegetation and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: eastern end of the island; landing either on the sand beach to the north, or on the cobbled southern beach.<br />Secondary: northern shore of the western end of the island, with easiest access at high water. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Monitoring sites for chinstrap penguins above and southeast of the eastern landing area.<br />Closed Area B: Central part of the island covered by a very extensive moss carpet and the northern cliffs where southern giant petrels nest.<br />Closed Area C: Knoll on the southwestern tip of the island where southern giant petrels nest. Free Roaming Area: Visitors can roam freely, but under supervision, anywhere except the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetated areas. Elsewhere, tread gently to avoid disturbing ground surfaces which may host inconspicuous biota.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: Stay clear of cliffs and vertical walls and stacks as these are prone to rock falls and slides.
Day 5, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Point Wild
Point Wild
Point Wild is an unassuming, narrow sand and rock point, with steep tidewater glaciers and cliffs on its edges. However, this small bit of land has a starring role in history - it was named after Frank Wild, the leader of the survivors of Sir Ernest Shackleton's shipwrecked expedition. 15 men camped here and managed to survive for four months of Antarctic winter before they were rescued by a Chilean naval ship in August 1916. There is a memorial commemorating the captain of the rescuing vessel with an impressive bronze bust to be found here, as well as several inscriptions. You will often find members of a colony of chinstrap penguins “guarding” the monolith! The waters around Point Wild are famous for “snagging” icebergs on their hidden underwater rocks, and there is always a chance to witness the nearby glacier carving into the waters. Due to the sea conditions, landing is not always possible here, but a close passage will let you marvel at the isolation and inhospitable conditions that Shackleton’s team endured. You can also admire the amazing glaciers and stunning geology of the area around the point.
Day 6, AM
Penguin Island Map
Penguin Island
Penguin Island was first record in 1820 during a British expedition. It was so-named because of the vast numbers of penguins that could be seen along its shoreline from the ship as it passed by. Penguin Island lies just off the south coast of the much bigger King George Island. It’s ice-free and is oval-shaped, some 1 mile long. It’s standout geological feature is the 560ft tall Deacon Peak - a volcanic cone that is though to have last been active about 300 years ago. Penguin Island is an internationally-recognised important area for birds. As well as colonies of Adelie and Chinstrap penguins, the island is also home to large breeding colonies of southern giant petrels, antarctic terns and kelp gulls. You can often see Weddell seals and sometimes southern elephant seals on the beaches here, too. For those feeling fit, there is a marked path that will take you up to the top of Deacon Peak. This offers unparalleled views over the whole island and beyond across King George Bay. Do note, however, that this part of the antarctic is known for its quickly changing weather, so if the opportunity to presents itself, take it!
Day 6, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Turret Point
Turret Point
Topography: Turret Point is marked by conspicuous rock stacks that form the eastern limit of King George Bay west of Three Sisters Point. There is a cobble beach on the southern coast and melt pools inland. The beach gently slopes to an extensive, heavily crevassed glacier. Potential Impact: Trampling of vegetation en route to the glacier and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 2 ships per day (midnight to midnight).* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: along an exposed broad cobble beach to the south, which may be packed with ice.<br /><br />Secondary: to the west. If this is used, be sure to stay clear of nesting sites for southern giant petrel at both ends of the beach (Closed Areas A and B).<br /> Closed Area: Closed Area A: Biodiverse fragile area including nesting southern giant petrels, kelp gulls, chinstrap penguins, blue-eyed shags and elephant seals wallows.<br />Closed Area B: Nesting southern giant petrels.<br />Closed Area C: Elevated area above the beach with nesting southern giant petrels.<br /> Guided Walking Area: Visitors to the glacier should be guided in small groups following the streambed to avoid trampling of vegetation. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely, but under supervision, between the landing beaches, avoiding the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation. Cautionary Notes: While weather conditions can change rapidly anywhere in the Antarctic, this location is particularly prone to such changes.
Day 6, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Whaler's Bay
Whalers Bay
Topography: Whalers Bay is a small harbour located immediately to the northeast after passing through Neptune’s Bellows. The Whalers Bay site includes a semi-circular, gently sloping ash beach, which is approximately 2km in length and stretches from Penfold Point in the northwest to Cathedral Crags in the southeast. Kroner Lake, a geo-thermally heated lagoon, is located on the western side of the bay. Ronald Hill (103m) is located 800m north of the lagoon, whilst steep glacier cliffs with dark grey pyroclastic layers rise immediately to the northwest. A collapse of Cathedral Crags on the south-eastern side of Whalers Bay is known as Neptune’s Window. Of particular importance are the low fluvial terraces behind the site of the whaling station and remains of the lahar (mud slide) which formed as a result of an eruption in 1969. Visitor Impact: Graffiti on historic structures. Removal of historic artefacts. Erosion of footpaths en route toNeptunes Window. There is known erosion and trampling of vegetation on the path between Baily Head and Whalers Bay. Potential Impact: Damage to or removal of historic artefacts. Trampling of vegetation. Erosion of further paths. Fire. Damage to beach area due to ship operations (anchoring, release of pollutants, maritime accidents, etc.). Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Comments: Guides should be positioned at key locations to ensure, in particular, no entry into ASPA 140, butalso at other locations such as Biscoe House, the fuel tanks and Neptune’s Window. Landing Area: The recommended landing site for small boat operations is in the area in front of and adjacent to the floating dock, although be sensitive to the presence of birds and/or seals. <br /><br />The area directly in front of the whalers’ boilers can be used as a secondary landing site. <br /> Closed Area: Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA) No. 140 Parts of Deception Islands, Site K - Ronald Hill to Kroner Lake. Site K consists of (i) Kroner Lake and an area between c. 75 – 150m wide around the lake shoreline, (ii) the circular crater basin immediately south of Ronald Hill and (iii) the shallow gulley linking the two features (see Map). Access to Site K is prohibited. Access to buildings or other structures, including boilers and tanks, is prohibited unless for management purposes, or for shelter in an emergency**. <br /><br />The geologically important, and fragile, fluvial terraces located to the north of the whaling station. <br /><br />Visitors should not attempt to traverse the scree slope below Cathedral Crags, which is susceptible to rock falls. <br /> <br />** Visitors to the site do so at their own risk. Parties are not liable for any personal injury or damage to property that may be sustained. <br /> Guided Walking Area: Visitors to Neptune’s Window should proceed along the beach on the seaward side of the water-boats. However, if concentrations of wildlife are present on the shore visitors, should take an alternate path across the upper beach once past the water-boats, being careful not to step on heritage objects. Visitors should then walk up the slope towards the ‘window’ in single file, remaining on existing paths. Extreme caution should be exercised along the steep and friable edge of Neptune’s Window. Follow same route back down to the beach. <br /> <br />Visitors to Ronald Hill should proceed up the ridge north of the aircraft hangar, towards the peak of Ronald Hill. Distance should be kept from the steep western edge of the ridge which is friable and susceptible to erosion. Follow the same route back to the hangar before returning to the landing site. <br /> Free Roaming Area: Visitors can move freely under supervision on the seaward side of the whaling station and along the beach. Behavior Ashore: Do not enter buildings or tanks or sit or climb on the boats. Do not tread on any loose material across the site as this all forms part of the HSM.Approach oil and fuel tanks with caution. The foundations are vulnerable to erosion and the tanks are at risk of collapse.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Keep distance to nesting Kelp gulls on top of the flensing plan. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Do not hike between Whalers Bay and Baily Head as it can damage important vegetated areas, in particular Antarctica’s largest recorded stand of Antarctic pearlwort. The hike also presents a safety risk to visitors due to steep slopes, sheer drop-offs and often slippery terrain.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.To avoid entry into ASPA 140, do not go beyond the western end of the airplane hangar.Do not approach within 5 metres of any of the wooden buildings. Maintain a reasonable distance from all structures to avoid injury from collapsing debris.Do not dig bathing pits. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. All the buildings on this site are in poor physical condition and there is an ongoing risk that parts of these buildings may collapse or sections be blown off. Buildings should be approached with caution and entry is prohibited. Beware of sharp objects. In high winds, the whole area should be avoided because of the risk of flying debris. • Beware of hazardous substances. Materials containing asbestos are present at the site. • Be careful when crossing glacial streams as stones will be slippery. • Later in the season Fur seals are likely to be present on the beach and should be treated with caution."
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Telefon Bay
Telefon Bay on Deception Island
Topography: At the easternmost end of Telefon Bay, a gently sloping beach leads to a broad shallow valley which rises sharply to a number of unnamed volcanic craters. These are up to 45m in depth, although they are slowly being filled in by sediment and ice. The prominent ash cliffs that form the east and west sides of the valley are remnants of an older crater that was modified during an eruption in 1967, which broadened the valley itself. Potential Impact: Erosion of paths on crater ridge. Disturbance of scientific equipment. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Landing Area: Beach immediately to the south-west of the crater. Guided Walking Area: Visitors will be guided up to the crater in small closely supervised groups, with one guide per group of 1-15. Visitors should be closely supervised at the crater edge. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision in the landing beach area. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Stick to established paths where possible and move in single file on steep slopes.Walk slowly and carefully close at the crater edge.Do not tread on vegetated areas which are susceptible to trampling.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. • Exercise extreme caution when approaching the steep edge of the crater lip. The soil is friable and may collapse underfoot. • If seals are hauled out on the beach, slow down before landing."
Day 6, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island is made up of the cone of an active shield volcano. It last erupted in 1969. Its flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbour, although Baily Point is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream forms a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving at a time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Point include Antarctic Fur Seals who regular haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Point.
Day 7, AM
Northeast Beach map
Northeast beach of Ardley Island
Ardley Island is a small, rocky island about a mile long. It was first charted in 1935 but mistaken for a headland. It was not until aerial surveys years later that it was reclassified as an island. Ardley Island is an active summer research station, and you will often see scientists and researchers at work here. The huts that you can see from the beach are part of the research station and not able to be visited. The landing on the beach is just below the lighthouse, a distinctive feature that you will have spotted from out to see. This gently sloping cobble beach is the only place that visitors can arrive on Ardley. Visitor number are restricted due to the importance of the island as a breeding site for antarctic bird species. During your excursion on the island you will see a large gentoo penguin colony, as well as lesser numbers of Adelie and chinstrap penguins. You can also see southern giant petrels, Wilson's petrels, black-bellied storm petrels, Cape petrels, skuas and Antarctic terns.
Day 7, AM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island, Mikkelsen Harbour, Trinity Island
D’Hainaut Island is a tiny rock island in Mikkelsen Harbour. It’s less than half a square mile in size, and it’s approached through a small bay that’s lined with dramatic cliffs of ice. It was first mapped by a French expedition in 1910. The island often remains snow-covered until very late in the season, and the captain of your Antarctic cruise vessel will expertly navigate through the shallow reefs that are in the bay. This island was used extensively for whaling, and there are artifacts and bones dotted around the island. D’Hainaut is one of the few Antarctic visitor sites where you can roam freely around the whole island, taking care not to disturb any of the artifacts and watching your step on the rocks, of course. There is a small historic refuge here that was built originally by the Argentine Navy in the 1950s, then again in the 1970s, and most recently in 2017. However, the refuge can’t be entered except in emergencies. There is also plenty of evidence of the whaling industry on the island. You can find the wrecks of several boats as well as many whale bones. There is a lively Gentoo penguin colony here, and you can often find Fur Seals basking in the sun.
Day 7, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Portal Point
Portal Point
Portal Point is a narrow, rocky point on the northeast of Reclus Peninsula. It was named by British explorers as it formed part of the “gateway” for the route to the Antarctic Plateau. In 1956, a refuge hut was established here, known as Cape Reclus Refuge. It was only used for two winters, and then abandoned. In 1996, the hut was removed and is now in the Falklands Island Museum. All that’s left of the refuge on the Point are the remains of its foundations, often not visible under the frequent snow cover. Indeed, this year-round snow is why there are no penguin colonies here. However, Portal Point is a popular place for Weddell seals to haul out, and while you are landing you will often see them in good numbers.
Day 8, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Georges Point, Rongé Island
Georges Point, Rongé Island
Rongé Island is high and rocky. Some 5 miles long, it’s the largest of the islands that form the west side of the Errera Channel. Georges Point was first mapped in 1897 by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition and named after one of it’s members. You land on a rocky beach with a penguin colony at one end that your expert Antarctic guides will guide you around. They will also take you on a carefully marked trail up to the higher ground behind the beach giving you a great view down over the concentrations of penguins along the shore. There are also often Antarctic Fur Seals to be found here as well as plenty of sea birds. The rocky cliffs and height of the island make for some magnificent backdrops and great opportunities to capture the essence of the Antarctic in your photographs.
Day 8, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour
Orne Harbour is a mile-wide cove on the west coast of Graham Land. It was first discovered by a Belgian Antarctic survey of 1898 and was then in regular use by whaling vessels in the early 1900s. The site is popular for two reasons. Firstly, it’s a beautiful location, providing stunning views. The exposed rocky shoreline contrasts with the permanent snow patches dotted on the higher ground above it. To the south, there is deep permanent snow and ice. Glaciers ring the harbour and steep peaks rise above. It’s glorious! The other reason to visit is the nesting colony of chinstrap penguins that have made their homes here. There’s a steep but safe hike up from the beach to the colony on higher ground. As well as the penguins, you will be rewarded with remarkable views of the bay, and the glacier that regularly calves into the waters.
Day 8, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Orne Islands
Orne Islands
The Orne Islands are a cluster of small, low-lying rocky islands at the entrance to the Errera Channel. The largest island has moderate slopes leading to a rocky central ridge that has permanent snow banks. There are also three other small islets that make up the group. Your landing will be via a low rock platform on the north-west side of the main island. Once ashore, you can roam freely around the island under the supervision of your expert guides. The Orne Islands are home to Skuas, which nest in the rocky outcrops here, as well as other Antarctic seabirds and penguins. In winter, impressive snow cliffs can form near the landing site. To avoid disturbing the wildlife, numbers on the island are restricted, and during nesting seasons your guides may restrict the areas in which you can roam to protect nests.
Day 8, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Damoy Point
Damoy Point
Damoy Point is a rocky headland on the west coast of Wiencke Island.Topography: Damoy Point is a rocky isthmus off the west coast of Wiencke Island, Antarctic Peninsula. It’s key points of interest are two very well preserved expedition huts. The first, known as Damoy Hut, was built in 1973 and was used by the British Antarctic Survey as a summer air facility and a personnel transfer station, but hasn’t been used since 1973. The interior is in excellent condition, and almost looks as if it could be put back into use straight away. There are even tin cups hanging on the kitchen wall as if ready to give travel-weary scientists a restoring cup of tea! Just outside Damoy Hut is a refuge built by Argentina in the 1950s. This is not open to visitors, and is still in use as an emergency refuge should the need ever arise. Apart from these historic buildings, visitors will see genroo penguins who breed here, as well as plenty of seals and sea birds.
Day 8, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Jougla Point
Jougla Point
Found at the western end of Wiencke Island in Port Lockroy, Jougla Point is a very rocky peninsula with many small coves. It was first mapped in 1903 by a French Antarctic expedition. The approach to the point is nothing short of dramatic! You will have stunning views of glaciers, snow cornices and steep, crevassed snowfields as you enter the harbour. Your landing here will be against rocks on the northeastern end of the point. Like many bays and coves in the area, Jougla Point has artefacts and remains from the whaling industry. You will see whale bones where the carcasses were dragged ashore for processing. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to observe the Gentoo penguin colony as well as the blue-eyed shag nesting areas. Other wildlife you can observe are kelp gulls and skuas, with seals a frequent site. You will be able to roam freely around the beach area to observe and photograph, with your guides on hand to answer any questions you may have and to ensure visitors keep away from any closed breeding areas.
Day 8, PM
Goudier Island
Goudier Island
Goudier Island is a small, low-lying island of bare, polished rock. Often surrounding by sea ice, snow cover usually melts away by the end of the summer. Goudier is home to “Base A” - established by the British in wartime in 1944 - which was used as a scientific research station until the early 60s. After fallen into disrepair, the station was restored in the 1990s, and is now looked after by a Heritage Trust. The base is permanently occupied, and the inhabitants still conduct important survey work on the penguin colony for the British Antarctic Survey. You will usually be briefed by the Base Leader before you land ashore, and only 35 visitors are allowed inside the Base at any time. This is to ensure the artifacts and the fabric of the base are preserved. This “time capsule” gives a fascinating insight into the work and lives of early Antarctic research pioneers and how they lived. Access to the rest of the island is usually restricted to marked paths, both to protect wildlife and because the surface is uneven and slippery. However, you will be able to observe the resident penguin colony, and can also spot other birds and seals on the shores and in the sea.
Day 9, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Port Charcot, Booth Island
Port Charcot, Booth Island
Port Charcot is a small bay at the north end of Booth Island. It was first mapped in 1904 when the French Antarctic expedition led by Jean-Baptise Charcot over-wintered here. After building a few rudimentary shelters and the cairn that can still be seen at the top of the hill, the expedition used Port Charcot as its base for exploring the area. There is a wooden pillar and plaque placed here with the names of the first expedition members still able to be discerned. The walk to the cairn is delightful, although you’ll be carefully led by guides as wandering off the path can be treacherous, with loose rocks and crevasses. Visitors can also walk to the east where there is a noisy Gentoo penguin colony. Chinstraps and Adelies can also often be seen on the beaches here.
Day 9, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Pleneau Island
Pleneau Island
Pleneau Island is one of the less visited site, but is well worth it. It’s a beautiful location that overlooks what’s known as an “iceberg graveyard”. Whether viewed from the island itself or from a Zodiac, there are always stunning ‘bergs to photograph here. The island itself is home to terns, and your expert Antarctic guides will make sure that you avoid disturbing them in the breeding season. The permanent ice cap at the top of the island looks stunning, but it’s riddled with cravasses and not safe to walk on. The northern end of the island hosts a breeding colony of blue-eyed shags, and you will almost certainly see penguin and seals as well as the stunning icebergs.
Day 9, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Petermann Island
Petermann Island
Petermann Island marks the extremes for two Antarctic species - not bad for a small rock less than a mile long! This rocky outcrop that rises 500ft above the sea has a permanent covering of ice. It’s home to the northernost colony of Adelie penguins, but also the southernmost colony of Gentoo penguins. First napped by a French expedition in 1909, Petermann Island is also home to breeding colonies of skuas and Wilson’s storm petrels. There’s alos a good chance to observe Weddell, crabeater and fur seals. Visitors can hike up to the highest point of the island, where a cross and cairn remembers three members of the British Antarctic Survey who died in 1982 attempting to cross the sea ice from Petermann Island to Vernadsky station. There is also a refuge hut built by an Argentian expedition in 1955 whose red metal walls make a fantastic contrast against the snow and ice.
Day 9, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Yalour Islands
Yalour Islands
The Yalour Islands are a 1.5-mile long group of small islands and protruding rocks. Most of the islands are steep-sided or unsuitable for landing due to sea conditions, but the largest island has some cobbled beaches where you can put ashore. Visitors come here to make the short climb up from the beach to the Adelie penguin breeding colonies. There are thought to be around 8,000 breeding pairs of Adelies in the Yalour Islands, and they have nested on every bit of rock they can find that’s not snow-covered. It makes for an amazing sight as you come in to land on the beach! Photographic opportunities here are excellent. The high mountains of the Antarctic Peninsula form a stunning backdrop to shots of the Adelie nest sites. Your expert guides will lead you around, showing you the best sites and answering all your questions about the penguins and their lives.
Day 10, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Wordie House
Wordie House, Winter Island
Nestled onto the only flat part of Winter Island, Wordie House is a hut built in 1947. It was named by a British Antarctic expedition of the time after James Wordie, who was the chief scientist on Shackleton’s famous 1914 Antarctic exploration. Before it closed in 1954, the hut was used to take meteorological readings using instruments stored inside special screens, one of which still stands today. These readings were among the most important and longest set of weather data ever recorded about the Antarctic, and helped scientists to a greater understanding of the meteorology of the continent. Wordie House was made a “Historic Site and Monument” in 1995 and has been looked after by the UK Antarctic Hertage Trust since 2009. There are almost 500 original artefacts still on the site, including original cans of coffee, records, pots and pans, plates, and more. This makes Wordie House a true time capsule from the golden age of Antarctic exploration and scientific research.The hut is now fully weathertight, and work continues on preserving this unique station. Visits to the site are managed by the nearby Ukrainian station Vernadsky, and you may well be briefed by the Base Commander or other official before you board your boats for the landing. Uniquely for such a historic site, visitors are allowed to roam freely under the supervision of their expert Antarctic guides. They will answer all your questions about the history of the hut, as well as the artifacts that you can find here. Visitors to Winter Island can also expect to see seabirds such as skuas and kelp gulls, seals and penguins.
Day 10, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 11, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 12, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 13, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 14, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 15, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 16, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 17, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 18, AM
Sail Falkland Islands
Sail to the Falkland Islands & Lectures
Enjoy the lecture and educational sessions about the extraordinary human and natural history of the Antarctic region. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 19, AM
Sail Falkland Islands
Sail to the Falkland Islands & Lectures
Enjoy the lecture and educational sessions about the extraordinary human and natural history of the Antarctic region. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 20, AM
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands is an archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean on the Patagonian Shelf. Penguins are abundant here, and the Falklands have the largest black-browed albatross colony in the world. In Stanley, meet the hardy local inhabitants whose colorful houses provide contrast to the long, dark winters.
Day 20, PM
Beagle Channel
Sail the Beagle Channel & Lectures
The Beagle Channel is a strait in Tierra del Fuego Archipelago on the extreme southern tip of South America between Chile and Argentina. The Beagle Channel is about 240 kilometres (130 nmi; 150 mi) long and is about 5 kilometres (3 nmi; 3 mi) wide at its narrowest point. It extends from Nueva Island in the east to Darwin Sound and Cook Bay of the Pacific Ocean in the west. Some 50 kilometres (27 nmi; 31 mi) from its western end it divides into two branches, north and south of Gordon Island. The southwest branch between Hoste Island and Gordon Island enters Cook Bay. The northwest branch between Gordon Island and Isla Grande enters Darwin Sound connecting to the Pacific Ocean by the O'Brien Channel and the Ballenero Channel. The biggest settlement on the channel is Ushuaia in Argentina followed by Puerto Williams in Chile. These are two of the southernmost settlements of the world.
Day 20, PM
Arrival to Ushuaia
Arrival to Ushuaia
You've arrived in Ushuaia. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 21, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark and Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

Where you will be

Meet hardy locals and spot unique wildlife in the Falkland Islands Explore abandoned whaling stations and visit Shackleton’s grave Walk quietly amongst king penguins and watch them surf onto the beach Learn about the environment and ecology from industry experts Spot whales and seals while cruising past icebergs aboard Zodiacs Set foot on the continent of Antarctica

Dates & Prices

Select date and passengers
Number of passengers
2

Your ship: G Expedition

Welcome aboard the G Expedition, an intimate and comfortable setting for an extraordinary adventure cruise to the ends of the earth. Described by many as a home away from home, the G Expedition combines outstanding accommodations, expert guides, hard to resist comfort food, and a relaxed and fun atmosphere making your trip to the polar regions an unforgettable experience. The 134 maximum passenger cruise ship is built to get you closer to some of our planet’s most amazing and remote places: The Arctic and Antarctic. Make your next cruise a trip you’ll remember for the rest of your life.

With its 5 cabin categories, the G Expedition suits all comfort levels. The beds are so comfortable, you’ll forget you’re on a moving cruise ship. All cabins are en suite, and have access to an outdoor view. Amenities aboard the G Expedition cruise include large public areas to enjoy during sea crossings and in between land excursions, the Penguin Library, a gear shop, a medical clinic with an English-speaking doctor, a fitness center, a sauna, and much more. Not to mention a friendly and professional hotel staff eager to make your stay the most comfortable possible. But a G Expedition cruise would not be complete without its large fleet of zodiacs, navigating you through the more remote Arctic and Antarctic paths, inaccessible by larger cruise ships. You’ll be able to get a closer look at all the endemic flora and fauna, and bring home some spectacular memories.

During a G Expedition Polar cruise, you will be led by a professional and highly-skilled team of on-board experts. Experts in everything from Geology to Marine Biology, these enthusiastic and knowledgeable crew members offer unique insight and hand-on attention you won’t find in a guidebook. With a 10:1 guest to expert ratio, you’ll feel a more intimate experience and a deeper understanding of the incredible polar regions. Head over to The Lounge daily for compelling debriefs of what you have seen during your land expedition. You will also receive interesting lectures illustrating what you might see the following day on your next expedition. The best part about a G Expedition polar cruise is that you can relax knowing you are in the hands of experts who really care to make your trip to the Arctic and Antarctic a magical one.

Each G Expedition polar cruise passenger will receive their own exclusive parka, included with their tour. Tour the Arctic and Antarctic in complete comfort with your high-performance parka, specifically designed for adventuring the coldest weather. The official G Expedition parka combines breathable waterproof fabric, a removable 5 cm insulated liner, reflective taping, and a removable hood with micro fleece lining. Explore the rugged polar regions in style and comfort.

Amenities

Mudroom Icon
Mudroom
Cocktail Symbol
Bar
Library Icon
Library
Observation Deck Icon
Observation Deck
Zodia Symbol
Zodiac Fleet
Sauna Icon
Sauna
Fitness Center Icon
Fitness Center
Gift Shop Icon
Gift Shop
parka icon
Expedition Parka

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
As a global travel company, the world is G Adventures' office and its playground. But most importantly, it’s home. The operators of the G Expedition are passionate champions of the environment and go to great lengths to preserve the places they explore by reducing on-tour waste, conserving water, cleaning up responsibly, and supporting organizations that protect the natural environments of the places travelers love. The G Expedition has put in place environmental policies that meet and exceed industry regulations, like a Forward-looking sonar, for example, which reduces the risk of anchoring on uncharted reefs or rocks.

Food & Drinks

The irresistible food provided aboard the G Expedition includes fine international cuisine and delicious comfort food. The Expedition's kitchen staff is a dazzling 30 people strong and can serve any needs. Vegetarian, Kosher, you name it - they can accommodate for it! All meals are served in the Albatross Dining room, an elegant and welcoming space large enough to accommodate all guest in one sitting. Meet and get to know your fellow passengers in an open-seating dining experience. Head over to the Polar Bear Pub for a drink and live music. Or if you’re brave enough, compete in a friendly dance competition. There is always something to do aboard a G Expedition polar cruise.

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