An Antarctica Cruise on board the G Expedition with Polartours

Falklands, South Georgia and Antarctica

The raw beauty of Antartica and the Falklands

Falklands, South Georgia and Antarctica

On board the G Expedition
22-Day Tour
Antarctic Cruise
100 Reviews
5/5
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Medical Services
24h Doctor Station
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Kayaks
Fees may apply
Challenge. Desolation. Unlimited wonder. It’s not difficult to grasp what attracted the great explorers to Antarctica. Get a personal appreciation for the struggle to tame the bottom of the world on this 22-day adventure to the land that entranced Ernest Shackleton and countless others since. Down here, you’ll explore the Falkland Islands, encounter abandoned whaling stations on South Georgia Island, and pay your respects at Shackleton’s grave. Elsewhere, you’ll catch up with penguins (king, chinstrap, gentoo, and Adélie varieties), learn all about them through daily lectures, get close to whales and cavorting seals from a Zodiac boat, and keep an eye peeled for towering icebergs and massive glaciers. Prepare to be astonished.

Your itinerary

Day 1, PM
Montevideo
Arrival to Montevideo
You've arrived to Montevideo, the capital of Uruguay. Your last destination on foot before embarking on your Antarctic cruise adventure.
Day 2, AM
Montevideo
Morning in Montevideo
The morning before you embark on your Antarctic cruise is free for you to visit the beautiful city of Montevideo.
Day 2, PM
Embarking ship
Embark in Montevideo
Embarkation on your new adventure vehicle begins in the afternoon. On the first day on board, meet the crew for a cruise expedition overview. The evening is spent onboard the ship sailing southwards.
Day 3, AM
Antarctic Peninsula
Sail to the Antarctic Peninsula & Lectures
With a close eye on weather conditions, continue southward along the western coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Passing colossal icebergs and countless colonies of penguins, push on with the goal in mind - crossing the Antarctic Polar Circle. Our goal is to attempt two excursions per day while navigating through the area but our itinerary and daily schedule will be based on the local weather and ice conditions.
Day 4, AM
Sail Falkland Islands
Sail to the Falkland Islands & Lectures
Enjoy the lecture and educational sessions about the extraordinary human and natural history of the Antarctic region. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 5, AM
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands is an archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean on the Patagonian Shelf. Penguins are abundant here, and the Falklands have the largest black-browed albatross colony in the world. In Stanley, meet the hardy local inhabitants whose colorful houses provide contrast to the long, dark winters.
Day 6, AM
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands is an archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean on the Patagonian Shelf. Penguins are abundant here, and the Falklands have the largest black-browed albatross colony in the world. In Stanley, meet the hardy local inhabitants whose colorful houses provide contrast to the long, dark winters.
Day 7, AM
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands
The Falkland Islands is an archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean on the Patagonian Shelf. Penguins are abundant here, and the Falklands have the largest black-browed albatross colony in the world. In Stanley, meet the hardy local inhabitants whose colorful houses provide contrast to the long, dark winters.
Day 7, PM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 8, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 9, AM
South Georgia
Sail to South Georgia & Lectures
Our lecture series resumes to prepare us for South Georgia, spend plenty of time on deck to identify the abundant seabirds of the South Ocean. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 10, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 11, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 12, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 13, AM
South Shetland Islands
South Georgia and Scotia Sea
South Georgia Island is home to many marvels including Shackleton’s grave, former whaling stations, incredible scenery and prolific wildlife. Weather permitting spend multiple days and opt to explore this island. A huge colony of king penguins is the highlight of this part of the journey. On nearby islands look out for the wandering albatross in their nesting grounds.
Day 17, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 18, AM
South Shetland Islands
Sail to the South Shetland Islands & Lectures
Sail for two days the legendary Elephant Island in the South Shetland Islands. Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 14, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Turret Point
Turret Point
Topography: Turret Point is marked by conspicuous rock stacks that form the eastern limit of King George Bay west of Three Sisters Point. There is a cobble beach on the southern coast and melt pools inland. The beach gently slopes to an extensive, heavily crevassed glacier. Potential Impact: Trampling of vegetation en route to the glacier and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 2 ships per day (midnight to midnight).* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: along an exposed broad cobble beach to the south, which may be packed with ice.<br /><br />Secondary: to the west. If this is used, be sure to stay clear of nesting sites for southern giant petrel at both ends of the beach (Closed Areas A and B).<br /> Closed Area: Closed Area A: Biodiverse fragile area including nesting southern giant petrels, kelp gulls, chinstrap penguins, blue-eyed shags and elephant seals wallows.<br />Closed Area B: Nesting southern giant petrels.<br />Closed Area C: Elevated area above the beach with nesting southern giant petrels.<br /> Guided Walking Area: Visitors to the glacier should be guided in small groups following the streambed to avoid trampling of vegetation. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely, but under supervision, between the landing beaches, avoiding the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation. Cautionary Notes: While weather conditions can change rapidly anywhere in the Antarctic, this location is particularly prone to such changes.
Day 14, AM
Penguin Island Map
Penguin Island
Penguin Island was first record in 1820 during a British expedition. It was so-named because of the vast numbers of penguins that could be seen along its shoreline from the ship as it passed by. Penguin Island lies just off the south coast of the much bigger King George Island. It’s ice-free and is oval-shaped, some 1 mile long. It’s standout geological feature is the 560ft tall Deacon Peak - a volcanic cone that is though to have last been active about 300 years ago. Penguin Island is an internationally-recognised important area for birds. As well as colonies of Adelie and Chinstrap penguins, the island is also home to large breeding colonies of southern giant petrels, antarctic terns and kelp gulls. You can often see Weddell seals and sometimes southern elephant seals on the beaches here, too. For those feeling fit, there is a marked path that will take you up to the top of Deacon Peak. This offers unparalleled views over the whole island and beyond across King George Bay. Do note, however, that this part of the antarctic is known for its quickly changing weather, so if the opportunity to presents itself, take it!
Day 14, PM
Northeast Beach map
Northeast beach of Ardley Island
Ardley Island is a small, rocky island about a mile long. It was first charted in 1935 but mistaken for a headland. It was not until aerial surveys years later that it was reclassified as an island. Ardley Island is an active summer research station, and you will often see scientists and researchers at work here. The huts that you can see from the beach are part of the research station and not able to be visited. The landing on the beach is just below the lighthouse, a distinctive feature that you will have spotted from out to see. This gently sloping cobble beach is the only place that visitors can arrive on Ardley. Visitor number are restricted due to the importance of the island as a breeding site for antarctic bird species. During your excursion on the island you will see a large gentoo penguin colony, as well as lesser numbers of Adelie and chinstrap penguins. You can also see southern giant petrels, Wilson's petrels, black-bellied storm petrels, Cape petrels, skuas and Antarctic terns.
Day 14, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Barrientos Island
Barrientos Island (Aitcho Islands)
Topography: This 1.5km island’s north coast is dominated by steep cliffs, reaching a height of approximately 70 metres, with a gentle slope down to the south coast. The eastern and western ends of the island are black sand and cobbled beaches. Columnar basalt outcrops are a notable feature of the western end. Visitor Impact: The erosion of multiple footpaths through vegetation between the eastern and western ends of the island. Potential Impact: Further damage to the vegetation and disturbance of wildlife, particularly southern giant petrels. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships per day: 2 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Curfew time period (from/to), in order to establish a rest period for wildlife: 22:00-04:00 Landing Area: Primary: eastern end of the island; landing either on the sand beach to the north, or on the cobbled southern beach.<br />Secondary: northern shore of the western end of the island, with easiest access at high water. Closed Area: Closed Area A: Monitoring sites for chinstrap penguins above and southeast of the eastern landing area.<br />Closed Area B: Central part of the island covered by a very extensive moss carpet and the northern cliffs where southern giant petrels nest.<br />Closed Area C: Knoll on the southwestern tip of the island where southern giant petrels nest. Free Roaming Area: Visitors can roam freely, but under supervision, anywhere except the closed areas. Behavior Ashore: Be careful near Antarctic fur seals, they may be aggressive.Walk slowly and carefully. Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetated areas. Elsewhere, tread gently to avoid disturbing ground surfaces which may host inconspicuous biota.When on the same level as, or higher than, nesting southern giant petrels, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed.Do not walk on any vegetation.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: Stay clear of cliffs and vertical walls and stacks as these are prone to rock falls and slides.
Day 15, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Hannah Point
Hannah Point
Topography: Hannah Point (the Point) is a narrow peninsula undulating upward to knife-edged ridges and vertical cliff edges 30-50 metres above sea level. There is loose scree on higher slopes and ridges, evidence of rock falls, and a Jaspar mineral vein. Ash-covered slopes link the Point to the flat open beach area of Walker Bay. Visitor Impact: Temporary paths form in the loose volcanic ash slopes closer to Walker Bay, and compacted paths are evident around the Point, formed by wildlife and possibly visitor use. In two reported instances since 1995 elephant seals have fallen from the cliff top wallow near the Jasper Dyke, due to disturbance. Potential Impact:Erosion and disturbance of vegetation and wildlife, especially as visitor space is limited on the Point. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 200 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: * A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Comments: No more than 100 visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders, with not more than 50 on the Point. The Point: Given the limited space at this site, visits are strongly discouraged from the start of the breeding season (October) until after early penguin incubation phase (mid-January). After then, maximum 1 ship per day (midnight to midnight). Visits to last no longer than 6 hours. No visitors on the Point between 22:00hrs and 04:00hrs (local time). Walker Bay: a maximum of 2 ships per day (midnight to midnight). Landing Area: Primary: The small cobble beach on the northern coast of Hannah Point.<br />Secondary: If conditions permit, an alternative landing area is the flat open area of Walker Bay, to the north of the Point.<br /> Closed Area: Closed Area A: Cliff area with nesting southern giant petrels.<br />Closed Area B: Rocky outcrops with nesting southern giant petrels, including a 50 metre buffer zone.<br /> Guided Walking Area: Because of restricted visitor space, all walks around the Point should be strictly controlled in guided groups of no more than 15-20 visitors, which are well spaced and which follow the same path. Visitors walking on the Point should proceed in single file along a designated route, avoiding wildlife and other sensitive features. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely, but under supervision, on the beach in Walker Bay, avoiding Closed Area B. Behavior Ashore: All visits are to be conducted in accordance with the General Guidelines for Visitors to the Antarctic.Be vigilant for nesting southern giant petrels and, when on the same level or higher elevation than the birds, maintain a precautionary distance of at least 50 metres. Increase this distance if any change in the birds’ behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: The Gentoo colonies are thought to be expanding and the Point and the landing beach may be quite crowded as the breeding season progresses. The primary landing beach may be crowded with wildlife – under such circumstances it would not be possible to make a landing and maintain the required precautionary distances. Both landing beaches are prone to swells. Be careful near the jasper dyke. It is brittle and may crumble. Exercise particular caution not to disturb animals near cliff edges. If they are disturbed, they may retreat and fall.
Day 15, PM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Telefon Bay
Telefon Bay on Deception Island
Topography: At the easternmost end of Telefon Bay, a gently sloping beach leads to a broad shallow valley which rises sharply to a number of unnamed volcanic craters. These are up to 45m in depth, although they are slowly being filled in by sediment and ice. The prominent ash cliffs that form the east and west sides of the valley are remnants of an older crater that was modified during an eruption in 1967, which broadened the valley itself. Potential Impact: Erosion of paths on crater ridge. Disturbance of scientific equipment. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Landing Area: Beach immediately to the south-west of the crater. Guided Walking Area: Visitors will be guided up to the crater in small closely supervised groups, with one guide per group of 1-15. Visitors should be closely supervised at the crater edge. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely under supervision in the landing beach area. Behavior Ashore: Take care not to displace penguins along the shoreline.Stick to established paths where possible and move in single file on steep slopes.Walk slowly and carefully close at the crater edge.Do not tread on vegetated areas which are susceptible to trampling.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. • Exercise extreme caution when approaching the steep edge of the crater lip. The soil is friable and may collapse underfoot. • If seals are hauled out on the beach, slow down before landing."
Day 15, PM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Pendulum Cove
Pendulum Cove
Topography: Small cove on the north-eastern side of Port Foster. The gently sloping ash and cinder beach leads to the HSM. Potential Impact: Damage to HSM 76; Disturbance to scientific activities and equipment. Accidental entry into and trampling of the vegetation in ASPA 140. Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200 passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 15 Landing Area: Access by sea all along the coastline of Pendulum Cove. Closed Area: Entry into site G of the ASPA 140 is prohibited. Guides or markers should be deployed/installed at the site in order to clearly indicate the boundaries of the ASPA. Guided Walking Area: Guides should be deployed around the Historic Site and Monument No. 76 site during visits. Visits to the HSM should only be carried out in small groups (less than 15 people) led by informed guides. Visitors should keep outside the periphery of the ruins of the main building and not travel within the remains. Visitors should not go inland beyond the station ruins. Free Roaming Area: Visitors may roam freely, but under close supervision, except in the closed and guided walking areas. Behavior Ashore: Do not walk on any vegetated areas. Elsewhere, tread gently to avoid disturbing ground surfaces which may host inconspicuous biota.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Respect conduct of scientific activities. Avoid interrupting researchers at work.Approaching closer than 20m can significantly affect the readings of sensitive scientific equipment. Maintain a distance of at least 20 metres from all monitoring equipment deployed in the area surrounding HSM 76. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.Do not dig bathing pits. Cautionary Notes: "• Water temperatures in excess of 70°C have been recorded at Pendulum Cove. Bathers are to be made aware of the potential risk of scalding. Expedition staff should carefully choose a ‘bathing area’ for passengers where the hot water mixes with the cooler sea-water. Shoes or boots should be worn when entering the water to avoid scalding one's feet. • For safety reasons, only small groups of visitors (less than 15 people) are to approach the Historic Site and Monument No. 76 simultaneously. Avoid areas of scattered construction materials (broken metals, etc.). • Caution should be taken approaching the HSM due to dangerous holes in the area, a distance of 15 metres should be maintained from the HSM. • All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption"
Day 16, AM
Antarctica Visitor Site- Baily Head, Deception Island
Baily Head on Deception Island
Deception Island is made up of the cone of an active shield volcano. It last erupted in 1969. Its flooded caldera makes a remarkable natural harbour, although Baily Point is on the eastern outer flank of the cone. The geography here makes a natural bowl, with the long rocky beach leading up to a curving ridge above. To the north is an impressive glacier. As you approach the beach you will begin to hear the amazing noise that a colony of over 200,000 chinstrap penguins can make! During the summer, the glacial melt stream forms a penguin “highway” that the birds follow to and from the sea, hundreds moving at a time. Your expert Antarctic guides will take you to the edge of the breeding groups, allow you to experience this remarkable sight without disturbing the birds. Other regular visitors to the Point include Antarctic Fur Seals who regular haul up on to the beach, with crabeater, elephant, Weddell and leopard seals also sometimes being seen in the surrounding waters. Overhead you will find skuas, petrels and sheathbills, all of whom also like to nest in the sheltered rocks of Baily Point.
Day 16, AM
Antarctica- Visitor Site Whaler's Bay
Whalers Bay
Topography: Whalers Bay is a small harbour located immediately to the northeast after passing through Neptune’s Bellows. The Whalers Bay site includes a semi-circular, gently sloping ash beach, which is approximately 2km in length and stretches from Penfold Point in the northwest to Cathedral Crags in the southeast. Kroner Lake, a geo-thermally heated lagoon, is located on the western side of the bay. Ronald Hill (103m) is located 800m north of the lagoon, whilst steep glacier cliffs with dark grey pyroclastic layers rise immediately to the northwest. A collapse of Cathedral Crags on the south-eastern side of Whalers Bay is known as Neptune’s Window. Of particular importance are the low fluvial terraces behind the site of the whaling station and remains of the lahar (mud slide) which formed as a result of an eruption in 1969. Visitor Impact: Graffiti on historic structures. Removal of historic artefacts. Erosion of footpaths en route toNeptunes Window. There is known erosion and trampling of vegetation on the path between Baily Head and Whalers Bay. Potential Impact: Damage to or removal of historic artefacts. Trampling of vegetation. Erosion of further paths. Fire. Damage to beach area due to ship operations (anchoring, release of pollutants, maritime accidents, etc.). Landing Requirements: "Max pax on board: 500 Ships at a time: 1 Comments: Maximum 3 ships per day, of which no more than 2 may be a vessel carrying more than 200passengers.* A ship is defined as a vessel which carries more than 12 passengers." Visitor Requirements: Maximum number of visitors at any time, exclusive of expedition guides and leaders: 100 Visitors per guide: 20 Comments: Guides should be positioned at key locations to ensure, in particular, no entry into ASPA 140, butalso at other locations such as Biscoe House, the fuel tanks and Neptune’s Window. Landing Area: The recommended landing site for small boat operations is in the area in front of and adjacent to the floating dock, although be sensitive to the presence of birds and/or seals. <br /><br />The area directly in front of the whalers’ boilers can be used as a secondary landing site. <br /> Closed Area: Antarctic Specially Protected Area (ASPA) No. 140 Parts of Deception Islands, Site K - Ronald Hill to Kroner Lake. Site K consists of (i) Kroner Lake and an area between c. 75 – 150m wide around the lake shoreline, (ii) the circular crater basin immediately south of Ronald Hill and (iii) the shallow gulley linking the two features (see Map). Access to Site K is prohibited. Access to buildings or other structures, including boilers and tanks, is prohibited unless for management purposes, or for shelter in an emergency**. <br /><br />The geologically important, and fragile, fluvial terraces located to the north of the whaling station. <br /><br />Visitors should not attempt to traverse the scree slope below Cathedral Crags, which is susceptible to rock falls. <br /> <br />** Visitors to the site do so at their own risk. Parties are not liable for any personal injury or damage to property that may be sustained. <br /> Guided Walking Area: Visitors to Neptune’s Window should proceed along the beach on the seaward side of the water-boats. However, if concentrations of wildlife are present on the shore visitors, should take an alternate path across the upper beach once past the water-boats, being careful not to step on heritage objects. Visitors should then walk up the slope towards the ‘window’ in single file, remaining on existing paths. Extreme caution should be exercised along the steep and friable edge of Neptune’s Window. Follow same route back down to the beach. <br /> <br />Visitors to Ronald Hill should proceed up the ridge north of the aircraft hangar, towards the peak of Ronald Hill. Distance should be kept from the steep western edge of the ridge which is friable and susceptible to erosion. Follow the same route back to the hangar before returning to the landing site. <br /> Free Roaming Area: Visitors can move freely under supervision on the seaward side of the whaling station and along the beach. Behavior Ashore: Do not enter buildings or tanks or sit or climb on the boats. Do not tread on any loose material across the site as this all forms part of the HSM.Approach oil and fuel tanks with caution. The foundations are vulnerable to erosion and the tanks are at risk of collapse.Maintain a precautionary distance of 5 metres from wildlife and give animals the right-of-way. Keep distance to nesting Kelp gulls on top of the flensing plan. Increase this distance if any change in behaviour is observed.Visits are to be undertaken in line with the Management Plan for Deception Island Antarctic Specially Managed Area (ASMA) No. 4.Do not hike between Whalers Bay and Baily Head as it can damage important vegetated areas, in particular Antarctica’s largest recorded stand of Antarctic pearlwort. The hike also presents a safety risk to visitors due to steep slopes, sheer drop-offs and often slippery terrain.Maintain at least a 20m distance from seismic monitoring equipment and other types of scientific equipment, which normally will be marked with a red flag. Do not touch or disturb other types of scientific instruments, markers or field depots. This equipment measures seismic activity and other volcanic indicators and are part of seismic network of Deception Island real time surveillance. A map of Deception Island seismic instrumentation, including seismic monitoring equipment will be available and updated for every season.To avoid entry into ASPA 140, do not go beyond the western end of the airplane hangar.Do not approach within 5 metres of any of the wooden buildings. Maintain a reasonable distance from all structures to avoid injury from collapsing debris.Do not dig bathing pits. Cautionary Notes: "• All visits must be planned to take into account the significant risk posed by the threat of volcanic eruption. All the buildings on this site are in poor physical condition and there is an ongoing risk that parts of these buildings may collapse or sections be blown off. Buildings should be approached with caution and entry is prohibited. Beware of sharp objects. In high winds, the whole area should be avoided because of the risk of flying debris. • Beware of hazardous substances. Materials containing asbestos are present at the site. • Be careful when crossing glacial streams as stones will be slippery. • Later in the season Fur seals are likely to be present on the beach and should be treated with caution."
Day 19, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 20, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 21, AM
Drake Passage
Crossing the Drake Passage
An 800 km body of water that connects Cape Horn in Chile to the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica, the shortest crossing from Antarctica to any other land mass. The crossing takes about 48 hours. At some point on the first day, cross the Antarctic Convergence, a meeting of cold polar water flowing north and warmer sub-antarctic water moving in the opposite direction. It is the largest biological barrier on earth and is marked by a change in temperature, salinity and nutrient levels. The north flowing Antarctic waters predominantly sink beneath southward moving sub-antarctic waters. While further south associated areas of mixing and upwelling create an ocean very high in marine productivity. During the long voyage across the Drake Passage, Attend lectures hosted throughout the day on everything from local wildlife to geology to history. The exceptional crew aboard your Antarctic cruise consists of professional and highly skilled historians, marine biologists, and naturalists who offer keen insight and a unique personal perspective to each and every adventure. There is always someone on hand to answer questions and provide greater insight and appreciation of the world at its extremes.
Day 22, AM
Disembark & goodbyes
Disembark and Say Goodbye
It's time to head back to land, as you say your goodbyes to your amazing crew and your new adventure buddies.

Where you will be

Meet hardy locals and see unique wildlife in the Falkland Islands Explore abandoned whaling stations and visit Shackleton’s grave Walk quietly amongst king penguins and watch them surf onto the beach Learn about the environment and ecology from industry experts Spot whales and seals while cruising through icebergs on Zodiacs

Dates & Prices

Select date and passengers
Number of passengers
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Your ship: G Expedition

Welcome aboard the G Expedition, an intimate and comfortable setting for an extraordinary adventure cruise to the ends of the earth. Described by many as a home away from home, the G Expedition combines outstanding accommodations, expert guides, hard to resist comfort food, and a relaxed and fun atmosphere making your trip to the polar regions an unforgettable experience. The 134 maximum passenger cruise ship is built to get you closer to some of our planet’s most amazing and remote places: The Arctic and Antarctic. Make your next cruise a trip you’ll remember for the rest of your life.

With its 5 cabin categories, the G Expedition suits all comfort levels. The beds are so comfortable, you’ll forget you’re on a moving cruise ship. All cabins are en suite, and have access to an outdoor view. Amenities aboard the G Expedition cruise include large public areas to enjoy during sea crossings and in between land excursions, the Penguin Library, a gear shop, a medical clinic with an English-speaking doctor, a fitness center, a sauna, and much more. Not to mention a friendly and professional hotel staff eager to make your stay the most comfortable possible. But a G Expedition cruise would not be complete without its large fleet of zodiacs, navigating you through the more remote Arctic and Antarctic paths, inaccessible by larger cruise ships. You’ll be able to get a closer look at all the endemic flora and fauna, and bring home some spectacular memories.

During a G Expedition Polar cruise, you will be led by a professional and highly-skilled team of on-board experts. Experts in everything from Geology to Marine Biology, these enthusiastic and knowledgeable crew members offer unique insight and hand-on attention you won’t find in a guidebook. With a 10:1 guest to expert ratio, you’ll feel a more intimate experience and a deeper understanding of the incredible polar regions. Head over to The Lounge daily for compelling debriefs of what you have seen during your land expedition. You will also receive interesting lectures illustrating what you might see the following day on your next expedition. The best part about a G Expedition polar cruise is that you can relax knowing you are in the hands of experts who really care to make your trip to the Arctic and Antarctic a magical one.

Each G Expedition polar cruise passenger will receive their own exclusive parka, included with their tour. Tour the Arctic and Antarctic in complete comfort with your high-performance parka, specifically designed for adventuring the coldest weather. The official G Expedition parka combines breathable waterproof fabric, a removable 5 cm insulated liner, reflective taping, and a removable hood with micro fleece lining. Explore the rugged polar regions in style and comfort.

Amenities

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Mudroom
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Bar
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Library
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Observation Deck
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Zodiac Fleet
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Sauna
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Fitness Center
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Gift Shop
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Expedition Parka

Sustainability

All CO2 emissions of your trip (e.g. local transport, hotel) will be 100% compensated for you by a Gold Standard climate protection project.
As a global travel company, the world is G Adventures' office and its playground. But most importantly, it’s home. The operators of the G Expedition are passionate champions of the environment and go to great lengths to preserve the places they explore by reducing on-tour waste, conserving water, cleaning up responsibly, and supporting organizations that protect the natural environments of the places travelers love. The G Expedition has put in place environmental policies that meet and exceed industry regulations, like a Forward-looking sonar, for example, which reduces the risk of anchoring on uncharted reefs or rocks.

Food & Drinks

The irresistible food provided aboard the G Expedition includes fine international cuisine and delicious comfort food. The Expedition's kitchen staff is a dazzling 30 people strong and can serve any needs. Vegetarian, Kosher, you name it - they can accommodate for it! All meals are served in the Albatross Dining room, an elegant and welcoming space large enough to accommodate all guest in one sitting. Meet and get to know your fellow passengers in an open-seating dining experience. Head over to the Polar Bear Pub for a drink and live music. Or if you’re brave enough, compete in a friendly dance competition. There is always something to do aboard a G Expedition polar cruise.

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